Outsourcing public relations pedagogy: Lessons from innovation, management futures, and stakeholder participation.

Paul Willis, David McKie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, we advocate for innovation in public relations pedagogy by importing ideas and practices from four areas. The first area involves work on disruptive technology and education that applies lessons from Silicon Valley innovations to high school education. The second area considers how knowledge management and project management findings confirm the value of teaching as the cocreation of knowledge. The third draws parallels between the challenges of moving from traditional to future management and moving from traditional to future education. All three areas offer models for innovation by adopting a more improvisational, experimental, and risk-taking ethos in education. In the fourth area, we shift from theoretical advocacy to look at how these innovations feed into an example of public relations pedagogy as co-created stakeholder participation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages466-469
Number of pages4
JournalPublic Relations Review
Volume37
Issue number5
Early online date21 Oct 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Public relations
Outsourcing
outsourcing
Innovation
Education
stakeholder
innovation
participation
management
Knowledge management
Project management
education
project management
school education
Teaching
knowledge management
Silicon
Stakeholder participation
Innovation management
Pedagogy

Cite this

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Outsourcing public relations pedagogy : Lessons from innovation, management futures, and stakeholder participation. / Willis, Paul; McKie, David.

In: Public Relations Review, Vol. 37, No. 5, 12.2011, p. 466-469.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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