Palliative Care in UK Prisons

Practical and Emotional Challenges for Staff and Fellow Prisoners

Mary Turner, Marian Peacock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite falling crime rates in England and Wales over the past 20 years, the number of prisoners has doubled. People over the age of 50 constitute the fastest growing section of the prison population, and increasing numbers of older prisoners are dying in custody. This article discusses some of the issues raised by these changing demographics and draws on preliminary findings from a study underway in North West England. It describes the context behind the rise in the numbers of older prisoners; explores the particular needs of this growing population; and discusses some of the practical and emotional challenges for prison officers, health care staff, and fellow prisoners who are involved in caring for dying prisoners in a custodial environment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-65
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Correctional Health Care
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Prisoners
Prisons
Palliative Care
England
Accidental Falls
Wales
Crime
Population
Demography
Delivery of Health Care

Cite this

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Palliative Care in UK Prisons : Practical and Emotional Challenges for Staff and Fellow Prisoners. / Turner, Mary; Peacock, Marian.

In: Journal of Correctional Health Care, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 56-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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