Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss

Ralf Paus, Iain S. Haslam, Andrey A. Sharov, Vladimir A. Botchkarev

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome.

LanguageEnglish
Pages50-59
Number of pages10
JournalThe Lancet Oncology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Alopecia
Hair Follicle
Drug Therapy
Hair
Organ Culture Techniques
Keratinocytes
Stem Cells
Apoptosis
Phenotype
Research

Cite this

Paus, Ralf ; Haslam, Iain S. ; Sharov, Andrey A. ; Botchkarev, Vladimir A. / Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss. In: The Lancet Oncology. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 50-59.
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Pathobiology of chemotherapy-induced hair loss. / Paus, Ralf; Haslam, Iain S.; Sharov, Andrey A.; Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

In: The Lancet Oncology, Vol. 14, No. 2, 01.02.2013, p. 50-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Paus, Ralf

AU - Haslam, Iain S.

AU - Sharov, Andrey A.

AU - Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

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N2 - Hair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome.

AB - Hair loss can be a psychologically devastating adverse effect of chemotherapy, but satisfactory management strategies for chemotherapy-induced alopecia remain elusive. In this Review we focus on the complex pathobiology of this side-effect. We discuss the clinical features and current management approaches, then draw upon evidence from mouse models and human hair-follicle organ-culture studies to explore the main pathobiology principles and explain why chemotherapy-induced alopecia is so challenging to manage. P53-dependent apoptosis of hair-matrix keratinocytes and chemotherapy-induced hair-cycle abnormalities, driven by the dystrophic anagen or dystrophic catagen pathway, play important parts in the degree of hair-follicle damage, alopecia phenotype, and hair-regrowth pattern. Additionally, the degree of hair-follicle stem-cell damage determines whether chemotherapy-induced alopecia is reversible. We highlight the need for carefully designed preclinical research models to generate novel, clinically relevant pointers to how this condition may be overcome.

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