Pattern analysis and metrology

The extraction of stable features from observable measurements

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55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To extract patterns from observable measurements we need to be able to define and identify stable features in observable measurements that persist in the presence of small artificial features such as noise, measurement errors, etc. The representational theory of measurement is used to define the stability of a measurement procedure. A technique, 'motif analysis', is defined to identify and remove 'insignificant' features while leaving 'significant' features. This technique is formalized and three properties identified that ensure stability. The connection of motif analysis with morphological closing filters is established and used to prove the stability of motif analysis. Finally, a practical metrology example is given of motif analysis in surface texture. Here motif analysis is used to segment a surface into its significant features.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2845-2864
Number of pages20
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
Volume460
Issue number2050
Early online date29 Jun 2004
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Oct 2004

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Pattern Analysis
Metrology
metrology
Morphological Filter
Surface Texture
closing
noise measurement
Measurement errors
textures
Measurement Error
filters
Textures

Cite this

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