Pharmaceutical pricing policies in Qatar and Lebanon: narrative review and document analysis

Nada Abdel Rida, Mohamed Izham Mohamed Ibrahim, Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Objectives
This study aimed at reviewing and analysing the pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in two middle‐east countries.

Methods
Official documents related to national pharmaceutical pricing policies were reviewed, and meetings with key informants in the registration and pricing departments in the Qatari and Lebanese ministries of public health were conducted.

Key findings
As of April 2017, the laws currently in effect in Qatar and Lebanon are based on the latest versions of decrees enacted in 2011 and 2005 respectively. Both countries have implemented similar pharmaceutical pricing policies which apply only to the private sectors in both countries. Landing price in Lebanon is either free‐on‐board (FOB) or cost‐insurance‐freight (CIF) while it is only CIF in Qatar. External reference pricing and mark‐up regulations were two of the common policies identified in both countries. For external reference pricing, the basket of countries considered and the price adopted were different. Mark‐ups were applied with different schemes along the pharmaceutical supply chain in each country with Qatar imposing an overall higher mark‐up margin. Moreover, Qatar utilized health technology assessment whenever such economic evaluation studies were available at the time of medicine registration. These pricing strategies applied to both public and private sectors in Lebanon, while they only applied to the private sector in Qatar.

Conclusions
The pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in Qatar and Lebanon are reflective of both the advancements in the human capital and financial resources of the nations and are in line with the World Health Organization‐recommended pricing policies for developing countries.
LanguageEnglish
Pages277-287
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research
Volume10
Issue number3
Early online date3 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

Fingerprint

Qatar
Lebanon
Drug and Narcotic Control
Costs and Cost Analysis
Private Sector
Insurance
Pharmaceutical pricing
Pricing policy
Biomedical Technology Assessment
Middle East
Public Sector
Developing Countries
Cost-Benefit Analysis

Cite this

@article{5c4c0b4fdfe84df89e778c0df65999bc,
title = "Pharmaceutical pricing policies in Qatar and Lebanon: narrative review and document analysis",
abstract = "ObjectivesThis study aimed at reviewing and analysing the pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in two middle‐east countries.MethodsOfficial documents related to national pharmaceutical pricing policies were reviewed, and meetings with key informants in the registration and pricing departments in the Qatari and Lebanese ministries of public health were conducted.Key findingsAs of April 2017, the laws currently in effect in Qatar and Lebanon are based on the latest versions of decrees enacted in 2011 and 2005 respectively. Both countries have implemented similar pharmaceutical pricing policies which apply only to the private sectors in both countries. Landing price in Lebanon is either free‐on‐board (FOB) or cost‐insurance‐freight (CIF) while it is only CIF in Qatar. External reference pricing and mark‐up regulations were two of the common policies identified in both countries. For external reference pricing, the basket of countries considered and the price adopted were different. Mark‐ups were applied with different schemes along the pharmaceutical supply chain in each country with Qatar imposing an overall higher mark‐up margin. Moreover, Qatar utilized health technology assessment whenever such economic evaluation studies were available at the time of medicine registration. These pricing strategies applied to both public and private sectors in Lebanon, while they only applied to the private sector in Qatar.ConclusionsThe pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in Qatar and Lebanon are reflective of both the advancements in the human capital and financial resources of the nations and are in line with the World Health Organization‐recommended pricing policies for developing countries.",
keywords = "external reference pricing, health technology assessment, mark-up, pharmaceutical, price, pricing policy",
author = "{Abdel Rida}, Nada and {Mohamed Ibrahim}, {Mohamed Izham} and Zaheer-Ud-Din Babar",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jphs.12304",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "277--287",
journal = "Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research",
issn = "1759-8885",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "3",

}

Pharmaceutical pricing policies in Qatar and Lebanon : narrative review and document analysis. / Abdel Rida, Nada; Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham; Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din.

In: Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research, Vol. 10, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 277-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pharmaceutical pricing policies in Qatar and Lebanon

T2 - Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research

AU - Abdel Rida, Nada

AU - Mohamed Ibrahim, Mohamed Izham

AU - Babar, Zaheer-Ud-Din

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - ObjectivesThis study aimed at reviewing and analysing the pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in two middle‐east countries.MethodsOfficial documents related to national pharmaceutical pricing policies were reviewed, and meetings with key informants in the registration and pricing departments in the Qatari and Lebanese ministries of public health were conducted.Key findingsAs of April 2017, the laws currently in effect in Qatar and Lebanon are based on the latest versions of decrees enacted in 2011 and 2005 respectively. Both countries have implemented similar pharmaceutical pricing policies which apply only to the private sectors in both countries. Landing price in Lebanon is either free‐on‐board (FOB) or cost‐insurance‐freight (CIF) while it is only CIF in Qatar. External reference pricing and mark‐up regulations were two of the common policies identified in both countries. For external reference pricing, the basket of countries considered and the price adopted were different. Mark‐ups were applied with different schemes along the pharmaceutical supply chain in each country with Qatar imposing an overall higher mark‐up margin. Moreover, Qatar utilized health technology assessment whenever such economic evaluation studies were available at the time of medicine registration. These pricing strategies applied to both public and private sectors in Lebanon, while they only applied to the private sector in Qatar.ConclusionsThe pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in Qatar and Lebanon are reflective of both the advancements in the human capital and financial resources of the nations and are in line with the World Health Organization‐recommended pricing policies for developing countries.

AB - ObjectivesThis study aimed at reviewing and analysing the pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in two middle‐east countries.MethodsOfficial documents related to national pharmaceutical pricing policies were reviewed, and meetings with key informants in the registration and pricing departments in the Qatari and Lebanese ministries of public health were conducted.Key findingsAs of April 2017, the laws currently in effect in Qatar and Lebanon are based on the latest versions of decrees enacted in 2011 and 2005 respectively. Both countries have implemented similar pharmaceutical pricing policies which apply only to the private sectors in both countries. Landing price in Lebanon is either free‐on‐board (FOB) or cost‐insurance‐freight (CIF) while it is only CIF in Qatar. External reference pricing and mark‐up regulations were two of the common policies identified in both countries. For external reference pricing, the basket of countries considered and the price adopted were different. Mark‐ups were applied with different schemes along the pharmaceutical supply chain in each country with Qatar imposing an overall higher mark‐up margin. Moreover, Qatar utilized health technology assessment whenever such economic evaluation studies were available at the time of medicine registration. These pricing strategies applied to both public and private sectors in Lebanon, while they only applied to the private sector in Qatar.ConclusionsThe pharmaceutical pricing policies implemented in Qatar and Lebanon are reflective of both the advancements in the human capital and financial resources of the nations and are in line with the World Health Organization‐recommended pricing policies for developing countries.

KW - external reference pricing

KW - health technology assessment

KW - mark-up

KW - pharmaceutical

KW - price

KW - pricing policy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067046691&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jphs.12304

DO - 10.1111/jphs.12304

M3 - Review article

VL - 10

SP - 277

EP - 287

JO - Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research

JF - Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research

SN - 1759-8885

IS - 3

ER -