Photography and Teaching in Community Development

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter will describe our experience of using photography to teach community development for first year university students. The students were required to take photographs as part of an assignment to compile a community profile in which they assessed the needs and assets of a community. Each student was asked to take two photographs, one positive or something they liked or valued and one negative or something they did not like, of their community. The guidance given to the students was not to take photographs of people without their permission or get involved in any dangerous or illegal activities that put them at any risk.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Pedagogy of the Social Sciences Curriculum
EditorsJamie P. Halsall, Michael Snowden
PublisherSpringer International Publishing AG
Pages85-92
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9783319338682
ISBN (Print)9783319338668
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Publication series

NameInternational Perspectives on Social Policy, Administration, and Practice
PublisherSpringer

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photography
community development
Teaching
student
community
assets
university
experience

Cite this

Hinds, G. (2017). Photography and Teaching in Community Development. In J. P. Halsall, & M. Snowden (Eds.), The Pedagogy of the Social Sciences Curriculum (pp. 85-92). (International Perspectives on Social Policy, Administration, and Practice). Springer International Publishing AG.
Hinds, Geoffrey. / Photography and Teaching in Community Development. The Pedagogy of the Social Sciences Curriculum. editor / Jamie P. Halsall ; Michael Snowden. Springer International Publishing AG, 2017. pp. 85-92 (International Perspectives on Social Policy, Administration, and Practice).
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Hinds, G 2017, Photography and Teaching in Community Development. in JP Halsall & M Snowden (eds), The Pedagogy of the Social Sciences Curriculum. International Perspectives on Social Policy, Administration, and Practice, Springer International Publishing AG, pp. 85-92.

Photography and Teaching in Community Development. / Hinds, Geoffrey.

The Pedagogy of the Social Sciences Curriculum. ed. / Jamie P. Halsall; Michael Snowden. Springer International Publishing AG, 2017. p. 85-92 (International Perspectives on Social Policy, Administration, and Practice).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Hinds G. Photography and Teaching in Community Development. In Halsall JP, Snowden M, editors, The Pedagogy of the Social Sciences Curriculum. Springer International Publishing AG. 2017. p. 85-92. (International Perspectives on Social Policy, Administration, and Practice).