Post-Fordist Illusions

Knowledge-Based Economies and Transformation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The argument that post-Fordism was able to overcome the oppressions and exploitations embedded within Fordist work relations has been subject to extensive critique for its evasion of capitalist antagonisms. However, there are particular analytic currents in radical thought which assert that knowledge-based economies hold within them not only radical, but also transformative possibilities. Such possibilities flow from developments in the forces of production and changes in the way in which surplus value is generated. These arguments tend to be located within what could be described as the knowledge economy as well as the creative industries. This article seeks to interrogate these arguments and suggests that, as with earlier discussions of post-Fordism, they are amenable to capitalist appropriation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalPower and Education
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

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post-Fordism
surplus value
cultural economy
economy
knowledge economy
antagonism
oppression
knowledge
exploitation

Cite this

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Post-Fordist Illusions : Knowledge-Based Economies and Transformation. / Avis, James.

In: Power and Education, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.03.2013, p. 16-27.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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