Predicting human intestinal absorption in the presence of bile salt with micellar liquid chromatography

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding intestinal absorption for pharmaceutical compounds is vital to estimate the bioavailability and therefore the in vivo potential of a drug. This study considers the application of micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) to predict passive intestinal absorption with a selection of model compounds. MLC is already known to aid prediction of absorption using simple surfactant systems; however, with this study the focus was on the presence of a more complex, bile salt surfactant, as would be encountered in the in vivo environment. As a result, MLC using a specific bile salt has been confirmed as an ideal in vitro system to predict the intestinal permeability for a wide range of drugs, through the development of a quantitative partition–absorption relationship. MLC offers many benefits including environmental, economic, time-saving and ethical advantages compared with the traditional techniques employed to obtain passive intestinal absorption values.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1618-1624
Number of pages7
JournalBiomedical Chromatography
Volume30
Issue number10
Early online date1 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

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Intestinal Absorption
Liquid chromatography
Bile Acids and Salts
Liquid Chromatography
Surface-Active Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Biological Availability
Permeability
Economics

Cite this

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title = "Predicting human intestinal absorption in the presence of bile salt with micellar liquid chromatography",
abstract = "Understanding intestinal absorption for pharmaceutical compounds is vital to estimate the bioavailability and therefore the in vivo potential of a drug. This study considers the application of micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) to predict passive intestinal absorption with a selection of model compounds. MLC is already known to aid prediction of absorption using simple surfactant systems; however, with this study the focus was on the presence of a more complex, bile salt surfactant, as would be encountered in the in vivo environment. As a result, MLC using a specific bile salt has been confirmed as an ideal in vitro system to predict the intestinal permeability for a wide range of drugs, through the development of a quantitative partition–absorption relationship. MLC offers many benefits including environmental, economic, time-saving and ethical advantages compared with the traditional techniques employed to obtain passive intestinal absorption values.",
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Predicting human intestinal absorption in the presence of bile salt with micellar liquid chromatography. / Waters, Laura J.; Shokry, Dina S.; Parkes, Gareth M B.

In: Biomedical Chromatography, Vol. 30, No. 10, 01.10.2016, p. 1618-1624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Shokry, Dina S.

AU - Parkes, Gareth M B

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AB - Understanding intestinal absorption for pharmaceutical compounds is vital to estimate the bioavailability and therefore the in vivo potential of a drug. This study considers the application of micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) to predict passive intestinal absorption with a selection of model compounds. MLC is already known to aid prediction of absorption using simple surfactant systems; however, with this study the focus was on the presence of a more complex, bile salt surfactant, as would be encountered in the in vivo environment. As a result, MLC using a specific bile salt has been confirmed as an ideal in vitro system to predict the intestinal permeability for a wide range of drugs, through the development of a quantitative partition–absorption relationship. MLC offers many benefits including environmental, economic, time-saving and ethical advantages compared with the traditional techniques employed to obtain passive intestinal absorption values.

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