Prosocial video game as an intimate partner violence prevention tool among youth: A randomised controlled trial

Daniel Boduszek, Agata Debowska, Adele Jones, Minhua Ma, David Smith, Dominic Willmott, Ena Trotman-Jemmott, Hazel Da Breo, Gill Kirkman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Evidence demonstrates that exposure to prosocial video games can increase players’ prosocial behaviour, prosocial thoughts, and empathic responses. Prosocial gaming has also been used to reduce gender-based violence among young people, but the use of video games to this end as well as evaluations of their effectiveness are rare. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a context-specific, prosocial video game, Jesse, in increasing affective and cognitive responsiveness (empathy) towards victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) among children and adolescents (N = 172, age range 9 – 17 years, M = 12.27, SD = 2.26). A randomised controlled trial was conducted in seven schools in Barbados. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (prosocial video game) or control (standard school curriculum) condition. Experimental and control group enrolled 86 participants each. Girls and boys in the experimental condition, but not their counterparts in the control condition, recorded a significant increase in affective responsiveness after intervention. This change was sustained one week after game exposure. No significant effects were recorded for cognitive responsiveness. Findings suggest that Jesse is a promising new IPV prevention tool among girls and boys, which can be used in educational settings.
LanguageEnglish
Pages260-266
Number of pages7
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume93
Early online date17 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Video Games
Randomized Controlled Trials
Barbados
Curricula
Violence
Curriculum
Control Groups
Intimate Partner Violence
Randomized Controlled Trial
Responsiveness
Boys
Affective

Cite this

@article{96b02aa49c3b45e3b6ab722d57ca286b,
title = "Prosocial video game as an intimate partner violence prevention tool among youth: A randomised controlled trial",
abstract = "Evidence demonstrates that exposure to prosocial video games can increase players’ prosocial behaviour, prosocial thoughts, and empathic responses. Prosocial gaming has also been used to reduce gender-based violence among young people, but the use of video games to this end as well as evaluations of their effectiveness are rare. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a context-specific, prosocial video game, Jesse, in increasing affective and cognitive responsiveness (empathy) towards victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) among children and adolescents (N = 172, age range 9 – 17 years, M = 12.27, SD = 2.26). A randomised controlled trial was conducted in seven schools in Barbados. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (prosocial video game) or control (standard school curriculum) condition. Experimental and control group enrolled 86 participants each. Girls and boys in the experimental condition, but not their counterparts in the control condition, recorded a significant increase in affective responsiveness after intervention. This change was sustained one week after game exposure. No significant effects were recorded for cognitive responsiveness. Findings suggest that Jesse is a promising new IPV prevention tool among girls and boys, which can be used in educational settings.",
keywords = "Affective and cognitive responsiveness, Caribbean, Intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention, Prosocial video game, Randomised controlled trial, Youth",
author = "Daniel Boduszek and Agata Debowska and Adele Jones and Minhua Ma and David Smith and Dominic Willmott and Ena Trotman-Jemmott and {Da Breo}, Hazel and Gill Kirkman",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.028",
language = "English",
volume = "93",
pages = "260--266",
journal = "Computers in Human Behavior",
issn = "0747-5632",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Prosocial video game as an intimate partner violence prevention tool among youth : A randomised controlled trial. / Boduszek, Daniel; Debowska, Agata; Jones, Adele; Ma, Minhua; Smith, David; Willmott, Dominic; Trotman-Jemmott, Ena; Da Breo, Hazel; Kirkman, Gill.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 93, 01.04.2019, p. 260-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prosocial video game as an intimate partner violence prevention tool among youth

T2 - Computers in Human Behavior

AU - Boduszek, Daniel

AU - Debowska, Agata

AU - Jones, Adele

AU - Ma, Minhua

AU - Smith, David

AU - Willmott, Dominic

AU - Trotman-Jemmott, Ena

AU - Da Breo, Hazel

AU - Kirkman, Gill

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Evidence demonstrates that exposure to prosocial video games can increase players’ prosocial behaviour, prosocial thoughts, and empathic responses. Prosocial gaming has also been used to reduce gender-based violence among young people, but the use of video games to this end as well as evaluations of their effectiveness are rare. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a context-specific, prosocial video game, Jesse, in increasing affective and cognitive responsiveness (empathy) towards victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) among children and adolescents (N = 172, age range 9 – 17 years, M = 12.27, SD = 2.26). A randomised controlled trial was conducted in seven schools in Barbados. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (prosocial video game) or control (standard school curriculum) condition. Experimental and control group enrolled 86 participants each. Girls and boys in the experimental condition, but not their counterparts in the control condition, recorded a significant increase in affective responsiveness after intervention. This change was sustained one week after game exposure. No significant effects were recorded for cognitive responsiveness. Findings suggest that Jesse is a promising new IPV prevention tool among girls and boys, which can be used in educational settings.

AB - Evidence demonstrates that exposure to prosocial video games can increase players’ prosocial behaviour, prosocial thoughts, and empathic responses. Prosocial gaming has also been used to reduce gender-based violence among young people, but the use of video games to this end as well as evaluations of their effectiveness are rare. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a context-specific, prosocial video game, Jesse, in increasing affective and cognitive responsiveness (empathy) towards victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) among children and adolescents (N = 172, age range 9 – 17 years, M = 12.27, SD = 2.26). A randomised controlled trial was conducted in seven schools in Barbados. Participants were randomly assigned to an experimental (prosocial video game) or control (standard school curriculum) condition. Experimental and control group enrolled 86 participants each. Girls and boys in the experimental condition, but not their counterparts in the control condition, recorded a significant increase in affective responsiveness after intervention. This change was sustained one week after game exposure. No significant effects were recorded for cognitive responsiveness. Findings suggest that Jesse is a promising new IPV prevention tool among girls and boys, which can be used in educational settings.

KW - Affective and cognitive responsiveness

KW - Caribbean

KW - Intimate partner violence (IPV) prevention

KW - Prosocial video game

KW - Randomised controlled trial

KW - Youth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059562417&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.028

DO - 10.1016/j.chb.2018.12.028

M3 - Article

VL - 93

SP - 260

EP - 266

JO - Computers in Human Behavior

JF - Computers in Human Behavior

SN - 0747-5632

ER -