Psychology and investigations

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter outlines the ways in which psychology can interact with and contribute to the investigative process. The contributions psychologists can make to investigations fall within three broad areas. The first of these is the examination of the styles and patterns of criminal action within offenders’ behaviour and the unravelling of how these relate to psychological and social characteristics, sometimes referred to as ‘offender profiling’. The work of psychologists can be used here to help in the identification of the sorts of individuals that may be responsible for a crime that is under investigation. Although sometimes assumed only to be relevant to serious, serial or sexual crimes, in fact these ‘investigative inferences’ can be derived for all forms of criminality from burglary or fraud or arson through to serial killing, kidnapping and terrorism.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationCriminal Psychology
Subtitle of host publicationTopics in Applied Psychology
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Chapter12
Pages177-192
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781444116953
ISBN (Print)9780203784235
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Crime
Psychology
Firesetting Behavior
Terrorism
Fraud

Cite this

Youngs, D. (2014). Psychology and investigations. In Criminal Psychology: Topics in Applied Psychology (pp. 177-192). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203784235
Youngs, Donna. / Psychology and investigations. Criminal Psychology: Topics in Applied Psychology. Taylor and Francis, 2014. pp. 177-192
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Youngs, D 2014, Psychology and investigations. in Criminal Psychology: Topics in Applied Psychology. Taylor and Francis, pp. 177-192. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203784235

Psychology and investigations. / Youngs, Donna.

Criminal Psychology: Topics in Applied Psychology. Taylor and Francis, 2014. p. 177-192.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Youngs D. Psychology and investigations. In Criminal Psychology: Topics in Applied Psychology. Taylor and Francis. 2014. p. 177-192 https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203784235