Puerperal fever as a source of conflict between midwives and medical men in eighteenthand early nineteenth-century Britain

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

The idea that midwives and medical men fought for control of childbirth in the eighteenth century has long been viewed as a part of the history of midwifery. It is an idea that has been accepted implicitly by most writers on the subject, even those who have warned that it might be an over-simplification.1 Originating from very different social backgrounds, the two groups operated from within radically different knowledge bases and drew on unique bodies of experience that overlapped less than might be supposed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew Directions in Nursing History
Subtitle of host publicationInternational Perspectives
PublisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter4
Pages55-67
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781134408498
ISBN (Print)0203403630, 9780203403631
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2004
Externally publishedYes

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