Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

Stephen E. Donnelly, Robert C. Birtcher

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils (≈20-50nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localised flow - i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO2 layers have indicated that pulsed localised flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO2-a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within ≈ 5nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-182
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume3413
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Sep 1998
Externally publishedYes
EventMaterials Modification by Ion Irradiation - Quebec, Que, Canada
Duration: 15 Jul 199816 Jul 1998

Fingerprint

Radiation Damage
Heavy Ions
ion impact
Radiation damage
Heavy ions
radiation damage
craters
metal surfaces
foils
heavy ions
Metals
Metal foil
SiO2
Ions
Melting
Cascade
Pulsatile flow
Nanoclusters
cascades
melting

Cite this

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title = "Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces",
abstract = "The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils (≈20-50nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localised flow - i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO2 layers have indicated that pulsed localised flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO2-a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within ≈ 5nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.",
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Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces. / Donnelly, Stephen E.; Birtcher, Robert C.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 3413, 17.09.1998, p. 174-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radiation damage from single heavy ion impacts on metal surfaces

AU - Donnelly, Stephen E.

AU - Birtcher, Robert C.

PY - 1998/9/17

Y1 - 1998/9/17

N2 - The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils (≈20-50nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localised flow - i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO2 layers have indicated that pulsed localised flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO2-a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within ≈ 5nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

AB - The effects of single ion impacts on the surfaces of films of Au, Ag, In and Pb have been studied using in-situ transmission electron microscopy. On all these materials, individual ion impacts produce surface craters, in some cases, with associated expelled material. The cratering efficiency scales with the density of the irradiated metal. For very thin Au foils (≈20-50nm), in some cases individual ions are seen to punch small holes completely through the foil. Continued irradiation results in a thickening of the foil. The process giving rise to crater and hole formation and other changes observed in the thin foils has been found to be due to pulsed localised flow - i.e. melting and flow due to the thermal spikes arising from individual ion impacts. Experiments carried out on thin films of silver sandwiched between SiO2 layers have indicated that pulsed localised flow also occurs in this system and contributes to the formation of Ag nanoclusters in SiO2-a system of interest for its non-linear optical properties. Calculation indicates that, when ion-induced, collision cascades occur near surfaces (within ≈ 5nm) with energy densities sufficient to cause melting, craters are formed. Crater formation occurs as a result of the explosive outflow of material from the hot molten core of the cascade. Processes occurring in the sandwiched layer are less well understood.

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