Raising the age of compulsory education in England: A neet solution?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper problematises the official discourse of economic competitiveness and social inclusion used by the 2007 Education and Skills Bill to justify the proposal to extend compulsory participation in education and training in England to the age of 18. Comparisons are drawn between this attempt to raise the age of compulsion and previous attempts, which took place in a significantly different socio-economic context. It is argued that the needs of those most likely to be affected by the current proposal - young people not in education, employment or training (NEET) - are subordinated to the needs of an English economy that is increasingly based upon low-skill, low-pay work relations.

LanguageEnglish
Pages420-439
Number of pages20
JournalBritish Journal of Educational Studies
Volume56
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

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compulsory education
participation in education
compulsion
competitiveness
economics
education
inclusion
economy
discourse

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Raising the age of compulsory education in England : A neet solution? / Simmons, Robin.

In: British Journal of Educational Studies, Vol. 56, No. 4, 12.2008, p. 420-439.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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