Real stakeholder education?

Lifelong learning in the Buffyverse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the representation of lifelong learning in Buffy the Vampire Slayer (BtVS). Critics acknowledge the series' representation of school life, but pay less attention to its emphasis on self-directed adult learning. The article draws on the extensive range of academic BtVS writing and on relevant educational theory concerned with radical adult education, lifelong and workplace learning to support its argument that the series presents institutional learning for adults as destructive and suspect in motivation. Self-directed and dialogical education, on the other hand, is shown to be painful and potentially dangerous, but essential for survival as a human being. This US series has an international audience and this article is written from the perspective of a UK adult educator.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-46
Number of pages16
JournalStudies in the Education of Adults
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2005

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lifelong learning
stakeholder
adult educator
learning
education
educational theory
Adult Education
critic
workplace
human being
school

Cite this

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Real stakeholder education? Lifelong learning in the Buffyverse. / Jarvis, Christine.

In: Studies in the Education of Adults, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.03.2005, p. 31-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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