Relationship between obesity, ethnicity and risk of late stillbirth: a case control study

Tomasina Stacey, John MD Thompson, Edwin A Mitchell, Alec J Ekeroma, Jane M Zuccollo, Lesley ME McCowan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In high income countries there has been little improvement in stillbirth rates over the past two decades. Previous studies have indicated an ethnic disparity in the rate of stillbirths. This study aimed to determine whether maternal ethnicity is independently associated with late stillbirth in New Zealand.
Methods: Cases were women with a singleton, late stillbirth (≥28 weeks’ gestation) without congenital abnormality, born between July 2006 and June 2009 in Auckland, New Zealand. Two controls with ongoing pregnancies were randomly selected at the same gestation at which the stillbirth occurred. Women were interviewed in the first few weeks following stillbirth, or at the equivalent gestation for controls. Detailed demographic data were recorded. The study was powered to detect an odds ratio of 2, with a power of 80% at the 5% level of significance, given a prevalence of the risk factor of 20%. A multivariable regression model was developed which adjusted for known risk factors for stillbirth, as well as significant risk factors identified in the current study, and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated.
Results: 155/215 (72%) cases and 310/429 (72%) controls consented. Pacific ethnicity, overweight and obesity, grandmultiparity, not being married, not being in paid work, social deprivation, exposure to tobacco smoke and use of recreational drugs were associated with an increased risk of late stillbirth in univariable analysis. Maternal overweight and obesity, nulliparity, grandmultiparity, not being married and not being in paid work were
independently associated with late stillbirth in multivariable analysis, whereas Pacific ethnicity was no longer significant (adjusted Odds Ratio 0.99; 0.51-1.91).
Conclusions: Pacific ethnicity was not found to be an independent risk factor for late stillbirth in this New Zealand study. The disparity in stillbirth rates between Pacific and European women can be attributed to confounding factors such as maternal obesity and high parity.
LanguageEnglish
Pages3-9
Number of pages7
JournalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Stillbirth
Case-Control Studies
Obesity
New Zealand
Pregnancy
Odds Ratio
Mothers
Parity
Tobacco Use
Street Drugs
Smoke
Demography
Confidence Intervals

Cite this

Stacey, T., Thompson, J. MD., Mitchell, E. A., Ekeroma, A. J., Zuccollo, J. M., & McCowan, L. ME. (2011). Relationship between obesity, ethnicity and risk of late stillbirth: a case control study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 11(1), 3-9. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2393-11-3
Stacey, Tomasina ; Thompson, John MD ; Mitchell, Edwin A ; Ekeroma, Alec J ; Zuccollo, Jane M ; McCowan, Lesley ME. / Relationship between obesity, ethnicity and risk of late stillbirth : a case control study. In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2011 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 3-9.
@article{bd221b06f3de46739eae5698906c9159,
title = "Relationship between obesity, ethnicity and risk of late stillbirth: a case control study",
abstract = "Background: In high income countries there has been little improvement in stillbirth rates over the past two decades. Previous studies have indicated an ethnic disparity in the rate of stillbirths. This study aimed to determine whether maternal ethnicity is independently associated with late stillbirth in New Zealand.Methods: Cases were women with a singleton, late stillbirth (≥28 weeks’ gestation) without congenital abnormality, born between July 2006 and June 2009 in Auckland, New Zealand. Two controls with ongoing pregnancies were randomly selected at the same gestation at which the stillbirth occurred. Women were interviewed in the first few weeks following stillbirth, or at the equivalent gestation for controls. Detailed demographic data were recorded. The study was powered to detect an odds ratio of 2, with a power of 80{\%} at the 5{\%} level of significance, given a prevalence of the risk factor of 20{\%}. A multivariable regression model was developed which adjusted for known risk factors for stillbirth, as well as significant risk factors identified in the current study, and adjusted odds ratios and 95{\%} confidence intervals were calculated.Results: 155/215 (72{\%}) cases and 310/429 (72{\%}) controls consented. Pacific ethnicity, overweight and obesity, grandmultiparity, not being married, not being in paid work, social deprivation, exposure to tobacco smoke and use of recreational drugs were associated with an increased risk of late stillbirth in univariable analysis. Maternal overweight and obesity, nulliparity, grandmultiparity, not being married and not being in paid work wereindependently associated with late stillbirth in multivariable analysis, whereas Pacific ethnicity was no longer significant (adjusted Odds Ratio 0.99; 0.51-1.91).Conclusions: Pacific ethnicity was not found to be an independent risk factor for late stillbirth in this New Zealand study. The disparity in stillbirth rates between Pacific and European women can be attributed to confounding factors such as maternal obesity and high parity.",
author = "Tomasina Stacey and Thompson, {John MD} and Mitchell, {Edwin A} and Ekeroma, {Alec J} and Zuccollo, {Jane M} and McCowan, {Lesley ME}",
year = "2011",
month = "1",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2393-11-3",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
pages = "3--9",
journal = "BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth",
issn = "1471-2393",
publisher = "BioMed Central",
number = "1",

}

Relationship between obesity, ethnicity and risk of late stillbirth : a case control study. / Stacey, Tomasina; Thompson, John MD; Mitchell, Edwin A; Ekeroma, Alec J; Zuccollo, Jane M; McCowan, Lesley ME.

In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Vol. 11, No. 1, 12.01.2011, p. 3-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Relationship between obesity, ethnicity and risk of late stillbirth

T2 - BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

AU - Stacey, Tomasina

AU - Thompson, John MD

AU - Mitchell, Edwin A

AU - Ekeroma, Alec J

AU - Zuccollo, Jane M

AU - McCowan, Lesley ME

PY - 2011/1/12

Y1 - 2011/1/12

N2 - Background: In high income countries there has been little improvement in stillbirth rates over the past two decades. Previous studies have indicated an ethnic disparity in the rate of stillbirths. This study aimed to determine whether maternal ethnicity is independently associated with late stillbirth in New Zealand.Methods: Cases were women with a singleton, late stillbirth (≥28 weeks’ gestation) without congenital abnormality, born between July 2006 and June 2009 in Auckland, New Zealand. Two controls with ongoing pregnancies were randomly selected at the same gestation at which the stillbirth occurred. Women were interviewed in the first few weeks following stillbirth, or at the equivalent gestation for controls. Detailed demographic data were recorded. The study was powered to detect an odds ratio of 2, with a power of 80% at the 5% level of significance, given a prevalence of the risk factor of 20%. A multivariable regression model was developed which adjusted for known risk factors for stillbirth, as well as significant risk factors identified in the current study, and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated.Results: 155/215 (72%) cases and 310/429 (72%) controls consented. Pacific ethnicity, overweight and obesity, grandmultiparity, not being married, not being in paid work, social deprivation, exposure to tobacco smoke and use of recreational drugs were associated with an increased risk of late stillbirth in univariable analysis. Maternal overweight and obesity, nulliparity, grandmultiparity, not being married and not being in paid work wereindependently associated with late stillbirth in multivariable analysis, whereas Pacific ethnicity was no longer significant (adjusted Odds Ratio 0.99; 0.51-1.91).Conclusions: Pacific ethnicity was not found to be an independent risk factor for late stillbirth in this New Zealand study. The disparity in stillbirth rates between Pacific and European women can be attributed to confounding factors such as maternal obesity and high parity.

AB - Background: In high income countries there has been little improvement in stillbirth rates over the past two decades. Previous studies have indicated an ethnic disparity in the rate of stillbirths. This study aimed to determine whether maternal ethnicity is independently associated with late stillbirth in New Zealand.Methods: Cases were women with a singleton, late stillbirth (≥28 weeks’ gestation) without congenital abnormality, born between July 2006 and June 2009 in Auckland, New Zealand. Two controls with ongoing pregnancies were randomly selected at the same gestation at which the stillbirth occurred. Women were interviewed in the first few weeks following stillbirth, or at the equivalent gestation for controls. Detailed demographic data were recorded. The study was powered to detect an odds ratio of 2, with a power of 80% at the 5% level of significance, given a prevalence of the risk factor of 20%. A multivariable regression model was developed which adjusted for known risk factors for stillbirth, as well as significant risk factors identified in the current study, and adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated.Results: 155/215 (72%) cases and 310/429 (72%) controls consented. Pacific ethnicity, overweight and obesity, grandmultiparity, not being married, not being in paid work, social deprivation, exposure to tobacco smoke and use of recreational drugs were associated with an increased risk of late stillbirth in univariable analysis. Maternal overweight and obesity, nulliparity, grandmultiparity, not being married and not being in paid work wereindependently associated with late stillbirth in multivariable analysis, whereas Pacific ethnicity was no longer significant (adjusted Odds Ratio 0.99; 0.51-1.91).Conclusions: Pacific ethnicity was not found to be an independent risk factor for late stillbirth in this New Zealand study. The disparity in stillbirth rates between Pacific and European women can be attributed to confounding factors such as maternal obesity and high parity.

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2393-11-3

DO - 10.1186/1471-2393-11-3

M3 - Article

VL - 11

SP - 3

EP - 9

JO - BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

JF - BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

SN - 1471-2393

IS - 1

ER -