Renaissance Music and Musicology: Challenges and Opportunities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In Summer 2002, when the International Musicological Society (IMS) gathered for its quiquennial meeting in Leuven, I was still a relatively junior scholar, with only a few grants and publications to my name. My presentation, "When Is a Madrigal Not a Madrigal?," focused on challenging the status of the musical score, which for over a century had been the primary tool for the study, analysis and performance of Renaissance music. After one set of afternoon sessions, I was thrilled to find myself walking next to Jessie Anne Owens, who generously engaged me in conversation (here I paraphrase): "I'm so glad," she said, "that you have decided to devote yourself to The What." "What?" I replied, confused. "The What," she repeated. "It used to be that every musicologist wanted to study Renaissance," and they say 'The What'."
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-402
Number of pages10
JournalI Tatti Studies
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Music
Madrigal
Musicology
Musicologists
Names
Paraphrase
Musical Score

Cite this

@article{bdadc2b749574ea8b4ddccdc60f52ca3,
title = "Renaissance Music and Musicology: Challenges and Opportunities",
abstract = "In Summer 2002, when the International Musicological Society (IMS) gathered for its quiquennial meeting in Leuven, I was still a relatively junior scholar, with only a few grants and publications to my name. My presentation, {"}When Is a Madrigal Not a Madrigal?,{"} focused on challenging the status of the musical score, which for over a century had been the primary tool for the study, analysis and performance of Renaissance music. After one set of afternoon sessions, I was thrilled to find myself walking next to Jessie Anne Owens, who generously engaged me in conversation (here I paraphrase): {"}I'm so glad,{"} she said, {"}that you have decided to devote yourself to The What.{"} {"}What?{"} I replied, confused. {"}The What,{"} she repeated. {"}It used to be that every musicologist wanted to study Renaissance,{"} and they say 'The What'.{"}",
keywords = "Renaissance music, Renaissance musicology",
author = "Laurie Stras",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1086/705435",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "393--402",
journal = "I Tatti Studies",
issn = "0393-5949",
publisher = "Casa Editrice Leo S. Olschki",
number = "2",

}

Renaissance Music and Musicology : Challenges and Opportunities. / Stras, Laurie.

In: I Tatti Studies, Vol. 22, No. 2, 01.10.2019, p. 393-402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Renaissance Music and Musicology

T2 - Challenges and Opportunities

AU - Stras, Laurie

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - In Summer 2002, when the International Musicological Society (IMS) gathered for its quiquennial meeting in Leuven, I was still a relatively junior scholar, with only a few grants and publications to my name. My presentation, "When Is a Madrigal Not a Madrigal?," focused on challenging the status of the musical score, which for over a century had been the primary tool for the study, analysis and performance of Renaissance music. After one set of afternoon sessions, I was thrilled to find myself walking next to Jessie Anne Owens, who generously engaged me in conversation (here I paraphrase): "I'm so glad," she said, "that you have decided to devote yourself to The What." "What?" I replied, confused. "The What," she repeated. "It used to be that every musicologist wanted to study Renaissance," and they say 'The What'."

AB - In Summer 2002, when the International Musicological Society (IMS) gathered for its quiquennial meeting in Leuven, I was still a relatively junior scholar, with only a few grants and publications to my name. My presentation, "When Is a Madrigal Not a Madrigal?," focused on challenging the status of the musical score, which for over a century had been the primary tool for the study, analysis and performance of Renaissance music. After one set of afternoon sessions, I was thrilled to find myself walking next to Jessie Anne Owens, who generously engaged me in conversation (here I paraphrase): "I'm so glad," she said, "that you have decided to devote yourself to The What." "What?" I replied, confused. "The What," she repeated. "It used to be that every musicologist wanted to study Renaissance," and they say 'The What'."

KW - Renaissance music

KW - Renaissance musicology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076463567&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1086/705435

DO - 10.1086/705435

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85076463567

VL - 22

SP - 393

EP - 402

JO - I Tatti Studies

JF - I Tatti Studies

SN - 0393-5949

IS - 2

ER -