Research ethics in the UK: What can sociology learn from health?

Sue Richardson, Miriam McMullan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The article reviews ethical consideration in social research and identifies current approaches to safeguarding ethical standards. One of these is the requirement to obtain approval from research ethics committees (RECs). Based on the results of a survey of UK social science academics about the process of applying to National Health Service RECs, we conclude that lessons can be learned for Sociology from the experiences of social researchers in Health. Overly rigid ethics committees could be counter-productive; we may need to reassess the functions of RECs and to strengthen other procedures to ensure the highest ethical standards for Sociology. Some suggestions for how this might be done are taken from the literature in the hope that they will stimulate debate.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1115-1132
Number of pages18
JournalSociology
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Richardson, Sue ; McMullan, Miriam. / Research ethics in the UK : What can sociology learn from health?. In: Sociology. 2007 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 1115-1132.
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Research ethics in the UK : What can sociology learn from health? / Richardson, Sue; McMullan, Miriam.

In: Sociology, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.12.2007, p. 1115-1132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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