Respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based, sexual trauma survey

Does a history of sexual victimization equate with risk for harm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based survey exploring sexual revictimization. The original survey provided a link to a separate mixed-methods survey assessing the impact of participation. Of the original 481 respondents, 234 completed this follow-up survey. Eighty percent were female and 52% reported histories of sexual victimization (SV). Newman, Willard, Sinclair, and Kaloupek's (2001) Reactions to Research Participation Questionnaire was adapted to suit this web-based design, and several open-ended questions were included. The statistical analysis revealed that those who experienced SV reported higher levels of distress and personal benefit and were less likely to be inconvenienced by participation. However, higher levels of benefit did not always compensate for greater levels of distress, particularly for those with more recent and more extensive histories of SV. The thematic analysis of the qualitative responses is discussed and suggestions are offered for the design of more ethically sensitive research protocols and practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)991-1004
Number of pages14
JournalViolence and Victims
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Crime Victims
victimization
trauma
participation
Wounds and Injuries
experience
statistical analysis
questionnaire
history
Surveys and Questionnaires
Research

Cite this

@article{c11afaf3c7274354b29ed4e28b2b2346,
title = "Respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based, sexual trauma survey: Does a history of sexual victimization equate with risk for harm",
abstract = "This study investigated respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based survey exploring sexual revictimization. The original survey provided a link to a separate mixed-methods survey assessing the impact of participation. Of the original 481 respondents, 234 completed this follow-up survey. Eighty percent were female and 52{\%} reported histories of sexual victimization (SV). Newman, Willard, Sinclair, and Kaloupek's (2001) Reactions to Research Participation Questionnaire was adapted to suit this web-based design, and several open-ended questions were included. The statistical analysis revealed that those who experienced SV reported higher levels of distress and personal benefit and were less likely to be inconvenienced by participation. However, higher levels of benefit did not always compensate for greater levels of distress, particularly for those with more recent and more extensive histories of SV. The thematic analysis of the qualitative responses is discussed and suggestions are offered for the design of more ethically sensitive research protocols and practices.",
keywords = "Cost-benefit analysis, Informed consent, Research ethics, Sexual victimization, Web survey",
author = "Wager, {Nadia M.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1891/0886-6708.27.6.991",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "991--1004",
journal = "Violence and Victims",
issn = "0886-6708",
publisher = "Springer Publishing Company",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based, sexual trauma survey

T2 - Does a history of sexual victimization equate with risk for harm

AU - Wager, Nadia M.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - This study investigated respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based survey exploring sexual revictimization. The original survey provided a link to a separate mixed-methods survey assessing the impact of participation. Of the original 481 respondents, 234 completed this follow-up survey. Eighty percent were female and 52% reported histories of sexual victimization (SV). Newman, Willard, Sinclair, and Kaloupek's (2001) Reactions to Research Participation Questionnaire was adapted to suit this web-based design, and several open-ended questions were included. The statistical analysis revealed that those who experienced SV reported higher levels of distress and personal benefit and were less likely to be inconvenienced by participation. However, higher levels of benefit did not always compensate for greater levels of distress, particularly for those with more recent and more extensive histories of SV. The thematic analysis of the qualitative responses is discussed and suggestions are offered for the design of more ethically sensitive research protocols and practices.

AB - This study investigated respondents' experiences of completing a retrospective web-based survey exploring sexual revictimization. The original survey provided a link to a separate mixed-methods survey assessing the impact of participation. Of the original 481 respondents, 234 completed this follow-up survey. Eighty percent were female and 52% reported histories of sexual victimization (SV). Newman, Willard, Sinclair, and Kaloupek's (2001) Reactions to Research Participation Questionnaire was adapted to suit this web-based design, and several open-ended questions were included. The statistical analysis revealed that those who experienced SV reported higher levels of distress and personal benefit and were less likely to be inconvenienced by participation. However, higher levels of benefit did not always compensate for greater levels of distress, particularly for those with more recent and more extensive histories of SV. The thematic analysis of the qualitative responses is discussed and suggestions are offered for the design of more ethically sensitive research protocols and practices.

KW - Cost-benefit analysis

KW - Informed consent

KW - Research ethics

KW - Sexual victimization

KW - Web survey

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879348580&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1891/0886-6708.27.6.991

DO - 10.1891/0886-6708.27.6.991

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 991

EP - 1004

JO - Violence and Victims

JF - Violence and Victims

SN - 0886-6708

IS - 6

ER -