Securitization and Banking Risk

What do we Know so Far?

Alper Kara, Aydin Ozkan, Yener Altunbas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose
– Bank securitisation is deemed to have been a major contributing factor to the 2007/2008 financial crises via fuelling credit growth accompanied by lower banks’ credit standards. Yet, prior to the crisis a common view was that securitisation activity makes the financial system more stable as risk was more easily diversified, managed and allocated economy-wide. The purpose of this paper is to review the extant literature to explore the so far generated knowledge on the impact of securitisation on banking risks. In particular, the authors examine the theoretical arguments and empirical studies on securitisation and banking risks before and after the global financial crisis of 2007/2008.

Design/methodology/approach
– Review and discussion of the literature.

Findings
– Theoretical literature univocally accentuate the undesirable consequences of securitisation, which may promote retention of riskier loans, undermine banks’ screening and monitoring incentives and enhance banks’ risk appetite. However, empirical evidence does not uniformly support the theoretical conclusions. If banks are securitisation active they lend more to risky borrowers, have less diversified portfolios and hold less capital, retain riskier loans and are aggressive in loan pricing. Others argue that securitisation reduces banks insolvency risk, increases profitability, provides liquidity and leads to greater supply of loans. Mortgage securitisation is an area where there is consistent evidence of bank risk taking via securitisation.

Originality/value
– The paper identifies open issues for future research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-16
Number of pages15
JournalReview of Behavioral Finance
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Banking risk
Securitization
Loans
Bank loans
Design methodology
Bank risk taking
Financial system
Profitability
Screening
Bank risk
Empirical evidence
Mortgages
Factors
Incentives
Insolvency risk
Financial crisis
Risk appetite
Liquidity
Credit growth
Loan pricing

Cite this

Kara, Alper ; Ozkan, Aydin ; Altunbas, Yener. / Securitization and Banking Risk : What do we Know so Far?. In: Review of Behavioral Finance. 2016 ; Vol. 8, No. 1. pp. 2-16.
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Securitization and Banking Risk : What do we Know so Far? / Kara, Alper; Ozkan, Aydin; Altunbas, Yener.

In: Review of Behavioral Finance, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2016, p. 2-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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