Sex tracking apps and sexual self-care

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

‘To-Do List: Masturbate’ reads one of the Instagram posts for the fashionable, new Lioness vibrator and tracking app. Lioness is just one of the most publicised of a spate of sex tracking apps principally aimed at women that have emerged over the past 5 years, which asks users to monitor their sexual interactions, and which also offers medical and holistic advice on how to improve one’s sex life. This article focuses on how the value of this technology is articulated through the rhetoric of self-care that connects these apps to the increasingly culturally pervasive valorisation of sex as a form of work; and how its connections both to self-care and quantification demonstrate important developments in post- and neoliberal feminism where objectivity and distance become central to the formation to female sexual subjectivity.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalNew Media and Society
Early online date11 Mar 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Mar 2022

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