Sexual Harassment on Public Transport in England: Prevalence, Experiences and Barriers to Reporting

Lorna Fielding, Calli Tzani-Pepelasi, Maria Ioannou, Vasiliki Artinopoulou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Sexual harassment can have detrimental effects on individuals’ lives, such as mental health problems, post-traumatic stress disorder, low self-worth and feelings of anxiety. In-spite of the hight rates, the creation of a universal definition of sexual harassment has not been straightforward, while what constitutes sexual harassment differs broadly across society and cultures (Gardner, Cui & Coiacetto, 2017). Sexually unwanted behaviours can vary in severity and are further distinguished between verbal harassment (i.e., inappropriate and offensive sexual comments or whistling), non-verbal cues (i.e., staring or leering sexually) and physical behaviours, (i.e., ranging from groping, touching to assault/rape). Types of behaviours witnessed or perceived to contribute to sexual harassment are reliant upon everyone’s relative awareness of sexual harassment and knowledge of their associated legal standing surrounding sexual harassment.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAssessment & Development Matters
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 23 Mar 2021

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