Sing a song of difference: Connie Boswell and a discourse of disability in jazz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although a wheelchair-user and permanently disabled through polio, the southern American singer Connie Boswell was one of radio and vaudeville's biggest stars in the 1930s. She and her sisters were a compelling force in American popular entertainment for the first half of the decade; and when the group split in 1936, Connie carried on a solo career in radio, recording, film and television for another twenty-five years. Connie's unique position as the only visibly disabled 'A-list' female popular entertainer for most of the twentieth century - and one whose voice, both physical and musical, shaped the sound of jazz and popular music - makes her an obvious focus for any study that links popular music and disability. This essay is concerned with how disability may have operated as a discourse about and within Connie's chosen medium, jazz; and how disability studies can illuminate why the ways in which difference is figured in her work, initially a source of anxiety, could have also been a significant reason for her success.

LanguageEnglish
Pages297-322
Number of pages26
JournalPopular Music
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Oct 2009
Externally publishedYes

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jazz
song
radio
music
disability
disability studies
discourse
entertainment
recording
television
twentieth century
career
anxiety
Group
Popular music
Song
Discourse
Jazz
Entertainers
Physical

Cite this

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abstract = "Although a wheelchair-user and permanently disabled through polio, the southern American singer Connie Boswell was one of radio and vaudeville's biggest stars in the 1930s. She and her sisters were a compelling force in American popular entertainment for the first half of the decade; and when the group split in 1936, Connie carried on a solo career in radio, recording, film and television for another twenty-five years. Connie's unique position as the only visibly disabled 'A-list' female popular entertainer for most of the twentieth century - and one whose voice, both physical and musical, shaped the sound of jazz and popular music - makes her an obvious focus for any study that links popular music and disability. This essay is concerned with how disability may have operated as a discourse about and within Connie's chosen medium, jazz; and how disability studies can illuminate why the ways in which difference is figured in her work, initially a source of anxiety, could have also been a significant reason for her success.",
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Sing a song of difference : Connie Boswell and a discourse of disability in jazz. / Stras, Laurie.

In: Popular Music, Vol. 28, No. 3, 20.10.2009, p. 297-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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