Singing research: Judaica 1 at The British Library

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article analyses a performance of Judaica 1 at The British Library in London, part of an ongoing research project to investigate the embodied technique of contemporary (Jewish) identity using a ‘laboratory’ methodology of post-Grotowskian songaction. Through a close analysis of this event, the article seeks to articulate some of the main concepts and questions that underpin the Judaica Project, such as the relevance of social epistemology to fields of embodied knowledge; the ethics and politics of embodied research in culturally defined areas of technique; and the relationship between referential meaning and non-lexical vocal form. Although the Judaica Project focuses specifically on Jewish songs, the proposed synthesis of scholarly epistemology and contemporary performance could have relevance for other projects in which embodied performance materials function both as markers of identity and as unfolding epistemic objects.
LanguageEnglish
Pages161-172
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2016

Fingerprint

British Library
Epistemology
Social Epistemology
Methodology
Referential
Embodied Knowledge
Song
Research Projects
Jewish Identity

Cite this

@article{3ae5a0da50284c96b452f8aa29cfebb4,
title = "Singing research: Judaica 1 at The British Library",
abstract = "This article analyses a performance of Judaica 1 at The British Library in London, part of an ongoing research project to investigate the embodied technique of contemporary (Jewish) identity using a ‘laboratory’ methodology of post-Grotowskian songaction. Through a close analysis of this event, the article seeks to articulate some of the main concepts and questions that underpin the Judaica Project, such as the relevance of social epistemology to fields of embodied knowledge; the ethics and politics of embodied research in culturally defined areas of technique; and the relationship between referential meaning and non-lexical vocal form. Although the Judaica Project focuses specifically on Jewish songs, the proposed synthesis of scholarly epistemology and contemporary performance could have relevance for other projects in which embodied performance materials function both as markers of identity and as unfolding epistemic objects.",
keywords = "Grotowski, Judaism, embodiment, epistemology, heritage, identiy, laboratory, song",
author = "Ben Spatz",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1386/jivs.1.2.161_1",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "161--172",
journal = "Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies",
issn = "2057-0341",
publisher = "Intellect",
number = "2",

}

Singing research : Judaica 1 at The British Library. / Spatz, Ben.

In: Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.05.2016, p. 161-172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Singing research

T2 - Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies

AU - Spatz, Ben

PY - 2016/5/1

Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - This article analyses a performance of Judaica 1 at The British Library in London, part of an ongoing research project to investigate the embodied technique of contemporary (Jewish) identity using a ‘laboratory’ methodology of post-Grotowskian songaction. Through a close analysis of this event, the article seeks to articulate some of the main concepts and questions that underpin the Judaica Project, such as the relevance of social epistemology to fields of embodied knowledge; the ethics and politics of embodied research in culturally defined areas of technique; and the relationship between referential meaning and non-lexical vocal form. Although the Judaica Project focuses specifically on Jewish songs, the proposed synthesis of scholarly epistemology and contemporary performance could have relevance for other projects in which embodied performance materials function both as markers of identity and as unfolding epistemic objects.

AB - This article analyses a performance of Judaica 1 at The British Library in London, part of an ongoing research project to investigate the embodied technique of contemporary (Jewish) identity using a ‘laboratory’ methodology of post-Grotowskian songaction. Through a close analysis of this event, the article seeks to articulate some of the main concepts and questions that underpin the Judaica Project, such as the relevance of social epistemology to fields of embodied knowledge; the ethics and politics of embodied research in culturally defined areas of technique; and the relationship between referential meaning and non-lexical vocal form. Although the Judaica Project focuses specifically on Jewish songs, the proposed synthesis of scholarly epistemology and contemporary performance could have relevance for other projects in which embodied performance materials function both as markers of identity and as unfolding epistemic objects.

KW - Grotowski

KW - Judaism

KW - embodiment

KW - epistemology

KW - heritage

KW - identiy

KW - laboratory

KW - song

UR - https://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=21727/

U2 - 10.1386/jivs.1.2.161_1

DO - 10.1386/jivs.1.2.161_1

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 161

EP - 172

JO - Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies

JF - Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies

SN - 2057-0341

IS - 2

ER -