Social marginalization and children's rights

HIV-affected children in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines the social epidemiology of HIV/AIDS within a Caribbean context and the specific ways in which children are affected. In particular, the article explores the nature of risk and vulnerability among especially marginalized children: street children. Literature on HIV/AIDS was reviewed, and semistructured interviews with 44 key informants were subjected to an analysis based on the feminist theory of intersectionality to explore the ways in which social marginalization intersects with risk and increases vulnerability to HIV infection. Despite advances in children's rights and the provision of testing and treatment programs, stigma, discrimination, and social marginalization combine to limit the rights and access to services of children affected by HIV/AIDS in Trinidad and Tobago. The author suggests that universal discourses on the concepts of risk and rights may be an inadequate basis for addressing the health and social needs of especially marginalized children and that targeted social action to tackle the processes of marginalization is also needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-300
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Social Work
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2009

Fingerprint

Social Marginalization
Trinidad and Tobago
social rights
children's rights
republic
HIV
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
AIDS
vulnerability
Homeless Youth
intersectionality
epidemiology
HIV Infections
Epidemiology
discrimination
Interviews
discourse
Health
interview
health

Cite this

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Social marginalization and children's rights : HIV-affected children in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. / Jones, Adele.

In: Health and Social Work, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.11.2009, p. 293-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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