Strategic Group (Analysis)

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

Abstract

“Strategic group” is a concept used in strategic management and strategic marketing that clusters together companies that pursue similar underlying strategies or have comparable business models. Companies are assigned to specific strategic groups through comparison along competitive dimensions such as pricing, product or service quality, firm size, and degree of vertical integration. More recently, attempts have been made to combine industrial organization‐ and resource‐based views in strategic management by conceptualizing strategic groups not as sets of companies with similar product market strategies but as organizations that share similar resource bundles. Strategic group analysis has been applied to a number of sectors including pharmaceuticals, computing, retail, and financial services. The concept and its assumptions have been subject to much criticism. Some commentators consider the predictive validity of strategic groups to be low or view strategic groups as statistical artifacts only. The theory has also been hampered by conflicting empirical findings and snapshot‐type analyses.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationWiley Encyclopedia of Management
PublisherWiley
ISBN (Electronic)9781118785317
ISBN (Print)9781119972518
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Strategic groups
Strategic management
Resources
Industrial organization
Retail services
Pharmaceuticals
Criticism
Predictive validity
Business model
Strategic marketing
Service quality
Firm size
Pricing
Market strategy
Resource-based view
Financial services
Vertical integration
Product market
Product quality

Cite this

Kasabov, Edward. / Strategic Group (Analysis). Wiley Encyclopedia of Management. Wiley, 2015.
@inbook{1886ab3d43744eeb8dc1c83e70a56302,
title = "Strategic Group (Analysis)",
abstract = "“Strategic group” is a concept used in strategic management and strategic marketing that clusters together companies that pursue similar underlying strategies or have comparable business models. Companies are assigned to specific strategic groups through comparison along competitive dimensions such as pricing, product or service quality, firm size, and degree of vertical integration. More recently, attempts have been made to combine industrial organization‐ and resource‐based views in strategic management by conceptualizing strategic groups not as sets of companies with similar product market strategies but as organizations that share similar resource bundles. Strategic group analysis has been applied to a number of sectors including pharmaceuticals, computing, retail, and financial services. The concept and its assumptions have been subject to much criticism. Some commentators consider the predictive validity of strategic groups to be low or view strategic groups as statistical artifacts only. The theory has also been hampered by conflicting empirical findings and snapshot‐type analyses.",
author = "Edward Kasabov",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1002/9781118785317.weom090255",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781119972518",
booktitle = "Wiley Encyclopedia of Management",
publisher = "Wiley",

}

Strategic Group (Analysis). / Kasabov, Edward.

Wiley Encyclopedia of Management. Wiley, 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionary

TY - CHAP

T1 - Strategic Group (Analysis)

AU - Kasabov, Edward

PY - 2015/1/21

Y1 - 2015/1/21

N2 - “Strategic group” is a concept used in strategic management and strategic marketing that clusters together companies that pursue similar underlying strategies or have comparable business models. Companies are assigned to specific strategic groups through comparison along competitive dimensions such as pricing, product or service quality, firm size, and degree of vertical integration. More recently, attempts have been made to combine industrial organization‐ and resource‐based views in strategic management by conceptualizing strategic groups not as sets of companies with similar product market strategies but as organizations that share similar resource bundles. Strategic group analysis has been applied to a number of sectors including pharmaceuticals, computing, retail, and financial services. The concept and its assumptions have been subject to much criticism. Some commentators consider the predictive validity of strategic groups to be low or view strategic groups as statistical artifacts only. The theory has also been hampered by conflicting empirical findings and snapshot‐type analyses.

AB - “Strategic group” is a concept used in strategic management and strategic marketing that clusters together companies that pursue similar underlying strategies or have comparable business models. Companies are assigned to specific strategic groups through comparison along competitive dimensions such as pricing, product or service quality, firm size, and degree of vertical integration. More recently, attempts have been made to combine industrial organization‐ and resource‐based views in strategic management by conceptualizing strategic groups not as sets of companies with similar product market strategies but as organizations that share similar resource bundles. Strategic group analysis has been applied to a number of sectors including pharmaceuticals, computing, retail, and financial services. The concept and its assumptions have been subject to much criticism. Some commentators consider the predictive validity of strategic groups to be low or view strategic groups as statistical artifacts only. The theory has also been hampered by conflicting empirical findings and snapshot‐type analyses.

UR - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/book/10.1002/9781118785317

U2 - 10.1002/9781118785317.weom090255

DO - 10.1002/9781118785317.weom090255

M3 - Entry for encyclopedia/dictionary

SN - 9781119972518

BT - Wiley Encyclopedia of Management

PB - Wiley

ER -