Student experiences of medicines management training and education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nurses on registration are expected to have sufficient knowledge and skills in medicine management to practice safely and competently. This article reports on research involving midwifery and nursing students, who were asked to complete a questionnaire related to their experiences of medicines-related training and education, and how it prepared them for practice. The results showed an overall satisfaction with the pre-registration delivery, but differences emerged in the perceived efficacy of different educational strategies. Clinically-based and simulated aspects of the programme delivery were highly rated, with theoretical delivery scoring poorly in contrast. A stepped approach is suggested, with medicine course delivery needing to be strongly highlighted as a lead up to safe and competent nursing interventions when administering medication and all other related interventions. A grant from the innovation fund at the University of Huddersfield funded an evaluation of students' experiences of medicines management education and training using a self-administered questionnaire.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)291-298
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Nursing
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2011

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Medicine
Students
Education
Organized Financing
Nursing Students
Practice Management
Midwifery
Financial Management
Nursing
Nurses
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

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Student experiences of medicines management training and education. / Hemingway, Steve; Stephenson, John; Allmark, Howard.

In: British Journal of Nursing, Vol. 20, No. 5, 08.03.2011, p. 291-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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