Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention

Y. M. Alahmadi, J. C. McElnay, M. P. Kearney, M. A. Aldeyab, F. A. Magee, J. Hanley, R. Bailie, W. Donaldson, K. Johnston, S. Kinoulty, A. Doherty, A. Tate, M. G. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood culture contamination (BCC) has been associated with unnecessary antibiotic use, additional laboratory tests and increased length of hospital stay thus incurring significant extra hospital costs. We set out to assess the impact of a staff educational intervention programme on decreasing intensive care unit (ICU) BCC rates to <3% (American Society for Microbiology standard). BCC rates during the pre-intervention period (January 2006-May 2011) were compared with the intervention period (June 2011-December 2012) using run chart and regression analysis. Monthly ICU BCC rates during the intervention period were reduced to a mean of 3·7%, compared to 9·5% during the baseline period (P < 0·001) with an estimated potential annual cost savings of about £250 100. The approach used was simple in design, flexible in delivery and efficient in outcomes, and may encourage its translation into clinical practice in different healthcare settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1964-1971
Number of pages8
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume143
Issue number9
Early online date12 Nov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Intensive Care Units
Length of Stay
Cost Savings
Hospital Costs
Microbiology
Regression Analysis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Delivery of Health Care
Blood Culture

Cite this

Alahmadi, Y. M. ; McElnay, J. C. ; Kearney, M. P. ; Aldeyab, M. A. ; Magee, F. A. ; Hanley, J. ; Bailie, R. ; Donaldson, W. ; Johnston, K. ; Kinoulty, S. ; Doherty, A. ; Tate, A. ; Scott, M. G. / Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention. In: Epidemiology and Infection. 2015 ; Vol. 143, No. 9. pp. 1964-1971.
@article{dbf849c962f74c769412cc931732f057,
title = "Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention",
abstract = "Blood culture contamination (BCC) has been associated with unnecessary antibiotic use, additional laboratory tests and increased length of hospital stay thus incurring significant extra hospital costs. We set out to assess the impact of a staff educational intervention programme on decreasing intensive care unit (ICU) BCC rates to <3{\%} (American Society for Microbiology standard). BCC rates during the pre-intervention period (January 2006-May 2011) were compared with the intervention period (June 2011-December 2012) using run chart and regression analysis. Monthly ICU BCC rates during the intervention period were reduced to a mean of 3·7{\%}, compared to 9·5{\%} during the baseline period (P < 0·001) with an estimated potential annual cost savings of about £250 100. The approach used was simple in design, flexible in delivery and efficient in outcomes, and may encourage its translation into clinical practice in different healthcare settings.",
keywords = "Adequate clinical practice, blood culture, educational intervention, false positives",
author = "Alahmadi, {Y. M.} and McElnay, {J. C.} and Kearney, {M. P.} and Aldeyab, {M. A.} and Magee, {F. A.} and J. Hanley and R. Bailie and W. Donaldson and K. Johnston and S. Kinoulty and A. Doherty and A. Tate and Scott, {M. G.}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1017/S0950268814003008",
language = "English",
volume = "143",
pages = "1964--1971",
journal = "Epidemiology and Infection",
issn = "0950-2688",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "9",

}

Alahmadi, YM, McElnay, JC, Kearney, MP, Aldeyab, MA, Magee, FA, Hanley, J, Bailie, R, Donaldson, W, Johnston, K, Kinoulty, S, Doherty, A, Tate, A & Scott, MG 2015, 'Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention', Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 143, no. 9, pp. 1964-1971. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268814003008

Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention. / Alahmadi, Y. M.; McElnay, J. C.; Kearney, M. P.; Aldeyab, M. A.; Magee, F. A.; Hanley, J.; Bailie, R.; Donaldson, W.; Johnston, K.; Kinoulty, S.; Doherty, A.; Tate, A.; Scott, M. G.

In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 143, No. 9, 07.2015, p. 1964-1971.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tackling the problem of blood culture contamination in the intensive care unit using an educational intervention

AU - Alahmadi, Y. M.

AU - McElnay, J. C.

AU - Kearney, M. P.

AU - Aldeyab, M. A.

AU - Magee, F. A.

AU - Hanley, J.

AU - Bailie, R.

AU - Donaldson, W.

AU - Johnston, K.

AU - Kinoulty, S.

AU - Doherty, A.

AU - Tate, A.

AU - Scott, M. G.

PY - 2015/7

Y1 - 2015/7

N2 - Blood culture contamination (BCC) has been associated with unnecessary antibiotic use, additional laboratory tests and increased length of hospital stay thus incurring significant extra hospital costs. We set out to assess the impact of a staff educational intervention programme on decreasing intensive care unit (ICU) BCC rates to <3% (American Society for Microbiology standard). BCC rates during the pre-intervention period (January 2006-May 2011) were compared with the intervention period (June 2011-December 2012) using run chart and regression analysis. Monthly ICU BCC rates during the intervention period were reduced to a mean of 3·7%, compared to 9·5% during the baseline period (P < 0·001) with an estimated potential annual cost savings of about £250 100. The approach used was simple in design, flexible in delivery and efficient in outcomes, and may encourage its translation into clinical practice in different healthcare settings.

AB - Blood culture contamination (BCC) has been associated with unnecessary antibiotic use, additional laboratory tests and increased length of hospital stay thus incurring significant extra hospital costs. We set out to assess the impact of a staff educational intervention programme on decreasing intensive care unit (ICU) BCC rates to <3% (American Society for Microbiology standard). BCC rates during the pre-intervention period (January 2006-May 2011) were compared with the intervention period (June 2011-December 2012) using run chart and regression analysis. Monthly ICU BCC rates during the intervention period were reduced to a mean of 3·7%, compared to 9·5% during the baseline period (P < 0·001) with an estimated potential annual cost savings of about £250 100. The approach used was simple in design, flexible in delivery and efficient in outcomes, and may encourage its translation into clinical practice in different healthcare settings.

KW - Adequate clinical practice

KW - blood culture

KW - educational intervention

KW - false positives

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930260426&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0950268814003008

DO - 10.1017/S0950268814003008

M3 - Article

VL - 143

SP - 1964

EP - 1971

JO - Epidemiology and Infection

JF - Epidemiology and Infection

SN - 0950-2688

IS - 9

ER -