Telephone-supported computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy

REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial

Simon Gilbody, Sally Brabyn, Karina Lovell, David Kessler, Thomas Devlin, Lucy Smith, Ricardo Araya, Michael Barkham, Peter Bower, Cindy Cooper, Sarah Knowles, Elizabeth Littlewood, David A. Richards, Debbie Tallon, David White, Gillian Worthy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials.AimsWe tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT.MethodWe compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months.ResultsUse of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5-3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI -0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints.ConclusionsTelephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)362-367
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume210
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Cognitive Therapy
Telephone
Randomized Controlled Trials
Health
Depression
Anxiety
Pragmatic Clinical Trials
Anxiety Disorders
Primary Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Psychology

Cite this

Gilbody, Simon ; Brabyn, Sally ; Lovell, Karina ; Kessler, David ; Devlin, Thomas ; Smith, Lucy ; Araya, Ricardo ; Barkham, Michael ; Bower, Peter ; Cooper, Cindy ; Knowles, Sarah ; Littlewood, Elizabeth ; Richards, David A. ; Tallon, Debbie ; White, David ; Worthy, Gillian. / Telephone-supported computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy : REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial. In: British Journal of Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 210, No. 5. pp. 362-367.
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abstract = "Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials.AimsWe tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT.MethodWe compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months.ResultsUse of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95{\%} CI 0.5-3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95{\%} CI -0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints.ConclusionsTelephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.",
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Gilbody, S, Brabyn, S, Lovell, K, Kessler, D, Devlin, T, Smith, L, Araya, R, Barkham, M, Bower, P, Cooper, C, Knowles, S, Littlewood, E, Richards, DA, Tallon, D, White, D & Worthy, G 2017, 'Telephone-supported computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy: REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial', British Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 210, no. 5, pp. 362-367. https://doi.org/10.1192/bjp.bp.116.192435

Telephone-supported computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy : REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial. / Gilbody, Simon; Brabyn, Sally; Lovell, Karina; Kessler, David; Devlin, Thomas; Smith, Lucy; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; Knowles, Sarah; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Richards, David A.; Tallon, Debbie; White, David; Worthy, Gillian.

In: British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 210, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 362-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Telephone-supported computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy

T2 - REEACT-2 large-scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial

AU - Gilbody, Simon

AU - Brabyn, Sally

AU - Lovell, Karina

AU - Kessler, David

AU - Devlin, Thomas

AU - Smith, Lucy

AU - Araya, Ricardo

AU - Barkham, Michael

AU - Bower, Peter

AU - Cooper, Cindy

AU - Knowles, Sarah

AU - Littlewood, Elizabeth

AU - Richards, David A.

AU - Tallon, Debbie

AU - White, David

AU - Worthy, Gillian

PY - 2017/5/1

Y1 - 2017/5/1

N2 - Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials.AimsWe tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT.MethodWe compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months.ResultsUse of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5-3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI -0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints.ConclusionsTelephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.

AB - Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy (cCBT) for depression has the potential to be efficient therapy but engagement is poor in primary care trials.AimsWe tested the benefits of adding telephone support to cCBT.MethodWe compared telephone-facilitated cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 187) to minimally supported cCBT (MoodGYM) (n = 182) in a pragmatic randomised trial (trial registration: ISRCTN55310481). Outcomes were depression severity (Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ)-9), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD)-7) and somatoform complaints (PHQ-15) at 4 and 12 months.ResultsUse of cCBT increased by a factor of between 1.5 and 2 with telephone facilitation. At 4 months PHQ-9 scores were 1.9 points lower (95% CI 0.5-3.3) for telephone-supported cCBT. At 12 months, the results were no longer statistically significant (0.9 PHQ-9 points, 95% CI -0.5 to 2.3). There was improvement in anxiety scores and for somatic complaints.ConclusionsTelephone facilitation of cCBT improves engagement and expedites depression improvement. The effect was small to moderate and comparable with other low-intensity psychological interventions.

U2 - 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.192435

DO - 10.1192/bjp.bp.116.192435

M3 - Article

VL - 210

SP - 362

EP - 367

JO - British Journal of Psychiatry

JF - British Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0007-1250

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