The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection

F. Elamin, O. Glikes, F. Gu, A. Ball

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are many acoustic emission (AE) sources in a diesel engine. During an engine cycle, fuel injection, onset of combustion, valve impacts and piston slaps all produce AE effects. Because these events happen around the top dead centre, it is difficult to separate them for the purpose of combustion monitoring. This study focuses on characterising AE signals measured on the cylinder head of a diesel engine for injection fault diagnosis. Firstly, AE signals are analysed to understand AE signals in association with engine operating conditions and sensor placement. Then, faulty injectors are tested to evaluate AE based injection fault detection. The results from joint angular and frequency analysis has shown that AE can clearly monitor the changes in the combustion process due to its high signal to noise ratio in the high frequency range from 10kHz to 45kHz where other vibro-acoustic sources have little influence.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies 2010, CM 2010/MFPT 2010
PublisherBritish Institute of Non-Destructive Testing
Pages1-11
Number of pages11
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9781618390134
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011
Event7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies - Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom
Duration: 22 Jun 201024 Jun 2010
Conference number: 7

Conference

Conference7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies
Abbreviated titleCM/MFPT 2010
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityStratford-upon-Avon
Period22/06/1024/06/10

Fingerprint

Cylinder heads
Acoustic emissions
Fault detection
Diesel engines
Engines
Fuel injection
Pistons
Failure analysis
Signal to noise ratio
Acoustics
Association reactions
Monitoring
Sensors

Cite this

Elamin, F., Glikes, O., Gu, F., & Ball, A. (2011). The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection. In 7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies 2010, CM 2010/MFPT 2010 (Vol. 1, pp. 1-11). British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing.
Elamin, F. ; Glikes, O. ; Gu, F. ; Ball, A. / The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection. 7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies 2010, CM 2010/MFPT 2010. Vol. 1 British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, 2011. pp. 1-11
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title = "The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection",
abstract = "There are many acoustic emission (AE) sources in a diesel engine. During an engine cycle, fuel injection, onset of combustion, valve impacts and piston slaps all produce AE effects. Because these events happen around the top dead centre, it is difficult to separate them for the purpose of combustion monitoring. This study focuses on characterising AE signals measured on the cylinder head of a diesel engine for injection fault diagnosis. Firstly, AE signals are analysed to understand AE signals in association with engine operating conditions and sensor placement. Then, faulty injectors are tested to evaluate AE based injection fault detection. The results from joint angular and frequency analysis has shown that AE can clearly monitor the changes in the combustion process due to its high signal to noise ratio in the high frequency range from 10kHz to 45kHz where other vibro-acoustic sources have little influence.",
keywords = "Acoustic emission, Diesel engine, Fuel injection, Misfire, Misfire detection",
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Elamin, F, Glikes, O, Gu, F & Ball, A 2011, The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection. in 7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies 2010, CM 2010/MFPT 2010. vol. 1, British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, pp. 1-11, 7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies, Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom, 22/06/10.

The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection. / Elamin, F.; Glikes, O.; Gu, F.; Ball, A.

7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies 2010, CM 2010/MFPT 2010. Vol. 1 British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, 2011. p. 1-11.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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T1 - The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection

AU - Elamin, F.

AU - Glikes, O.

AU - Gu, F.

AU - Ball, A.

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Y1 - 2011/8

N2 - There are many acoustic emission (AE) sources in a diesel engine. During an engine cycle, fuel injection, onset of combustion, valve impacts and piston slaps all produce AE effects. Because these events happen around the top dead centre, it is difficult to separate them for the purpose of combustion monitoring. This study focuses on characterising AE signals measured on the cylinder head of a diesel engine for injection fault diagnosis. Firstly, AE signals are analysed to understand AE signals in association with engine operating conditions and sensor placement. Then, faulty injectors are tested to evaluate AE based injection fault detection. The results from joint angular and frequency analysis has shown that AE can clearly monitor the changes in the combustion process due to its high signal to noise ratio in the high frequency range from 10kHz to 45kHz where other vibro-acoustic sources have little influence.

AB - There are many acoustic emission (AE) sources in a diesel engine. During an engine cycle, fuel injection, onset of combustion, valve impacts and piston slaps all produce AE effects. Because these events happen around the top dead centre, it is difficult to separate them for the purpose of combustion monitoring. This study focuses on characterising AE signals measured on the cylinder head of a diesel engine for injection fault diagnosis. Firstly, AE signals are analysed to understand AE signals in association with engine operating conditions and sensor placement. Then, faulty injectors are tested to evaluate AE based injection fault detection. The results from joint angular and frequency analysis has shown that AE can clearly monitor the changes in the combustion process due to its high signal to noise ratio in the high frequency range from 10kHz to 45kHz where other vibro-acoustic sources have little influence.

KW - Acoustic emission

KW - Diesel engine

KW - Fuel injection

KW - Misfire

KW - Misfire detection

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Elamin F, Glikes O, Gu F, Ball A. The analysis of acoustic emission signals from the cylinder head of a diesel engine for fault detection. In 7th International Conference on Condition Monitoring and Machinery Failure Prevention Technologies 2010, CM 2010/MFPT 2010. Vol. 1. British Institute of Non-Destructive Testing. 2011. p. 1-11