The application of optics polishing to free form knee implants

L. Blunt, P. Charlton, Anthony Beaucamp, X. Jiang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Free form surfaces have for some time played a part in the latest developments in the exploitation of new products in optics, from micro lenses up to ELT telescopes. The demands of the required tolerance on these "new" optics have led to significant improvements in manufacturing and metrology, as the capability to produce form in the tens of nanometre range coupled with nanometre surface roughness have become the critical enabler the their use. Free form surfaces are not limited to optics, and other product developments such as bio-implant surfaces in the prosthetics industry are utilising free form surfaces to make significant strides implant life. The prosthetic industry, have for some time, known from research into hip replacements, that significant reductions in the production of biologically damaging wear debris could be achieved by implementing hard on hard bearing couples rather than the traditional metal on polymer bearing couples. In these "new" knee joints the bearing couples comprise free form alumina on alumina or CoCr alloy on CoCr alloy surfaces. Unfortunately the application of these new materials for knee implants has been largely halted by the inability of manufacturers to polish their knee surfaces to the more demanding tolerances placed on free form hard on hard bearings of both form and roughness. These tolerances require micron level form deviation combined with nanometre surface finish in order to maintain full fluid film lubrication during in vivo functioning of the joint. This paper discusses the development of the capability to machine biomaterials for use as hard on hard knee joints. The surfaces are machined utilising a 7 axis CNC optics polishing machine, the Zeeko IRP200. The machine uses a novel precision technique to correctively polish components [1].

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2006
EditorsH. Zervos
Publishereuspen
Pages188-191
Number of pages4
Volume2
ISBN (Electronic)0955308208, 9780955308208
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Event6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology - Baden bei Wien, Vienna, Austria
Duration: 28 May 20061 Jun 2006
Conference number: 6

Conference

Conference6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology
Abbreviated titleEUSPEN 2006
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period28/05/061/06/06

Fingerprint

Polishing
polishing
Optics
Bearings (structural)
optics
Industrial Oils
Aluminum Oxide
Prosthetics
Alumina
aluminum oxides
Polishing machines
Surface roughness
industries
fluid films
product development
Biocompatible Materials
lubrication
exploitation
debris
Debris

Cite this

Blunt, L., Charlton, P., Beaucamp, A., & Jiang, X. (2006). The application of optics polishing to free form knee implants. In H. Zervos (Ed.), Proceedings of the 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2006 (Vol. 2, pp. 188-191). euspen.
Blunt, L. ; Charlton, P. ; Beaucamp, Anthony ; Jiang, X. / The application of optics polishing to free form knee implants. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2006. editor / H. Zervos. Vol. 2 euspen, 2006. pp. 188-191
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Blunt, L, Charlton, P, Beaucamp, A & Jiang, X 2006, The application of optics polishing to free form knee implants. in H Zervos (ed.), Proceedings of the 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2006. vol. 2, euspen, pp. 188-191, 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, Vienna, Austria, 28/05/06.

The application of optics polishing to free form knee implants. / Blunt, L.; Charlton, P.; Beaucamp, Anthony; Jiang, X.

Proceedings of the 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2006. ed. / H. Zervos. Vol. 2 euspen, 2006. p. 188-191.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - Free form surfaces have for some time played a part in the latest developments in the exploitation of new products in optics, from micro lenses up to ELT telescopes. The demands of the required tolerance on these "new" optics have led to significant improvements in manufacturing and metrology, as the capability to produce form in the tens of nanometre range coupled with nanometre surface roughness have become the critical enabler the their use. Free form surfaces are not limited to optics, and other product developments such as bio-implant surfaces in the prosthetics industry are utilising free form surfaces to make significant strides implant life. The prosthetic industry, have for some time, known from research into hip replacements, that significant reductions in the production of biologically damaging wear debris could be achieved by implementing hard on hard bearing couples rather than the traditional metal on polymer bearing couples. In these "new" knee joints the bearing couples comprise free form alumina on alumina or CoCr alloy on CoCr alloy surfaces. Unfortunately the application of these new materials for knee implants has been largely halted by the inability of manufacturers to polish their knee surfaces to the more demanding tolerances placed on free form hard on hard bearings of both form and roughness. These tolerances require micron level form deviation combined with nanometre surface finish in order to maintain full fluid film lubrication during in vivo functioning of the joint. This paper discusses the development of the capability to machine biomaterials for use as hard on hard knee joints. The surfaces are machined utilising a 7 axis CNC optics polishing machine, the Zeeko IRP200. The machine uses a novel precision technique to correctively polish components [1].

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PB - euspen

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Blunt L, Charlton P, Beaucamp A, Jiang X. The application of optics polishing to free form knee implants. In Zervos H, editor, Proceedings of the 6th International Conference European Society for Precision Engineering and Nanotechnology, EUSPEN 2006. Vol. 2. euspen. 2006. p. 188-191