The application of secondary Ion mass spectrometry to surface analysis of semiconductor substrates and devices

A. Brown, J. A. van den Berg, J. C. Vickerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The application of static, dynamic and imaging SIMS to semiconductor starting materials and devices is discussed. Static SIMS is used to examine the effect of various chemical preparation methods on the surface of the III‐V compounds InAs, InP and GaAs prior to epitaxial growth of device structures. Dynamic SIMS profiles from a superlattice structure involving alternative GaAlAs ‐ GaAs layers are presented along with an examination of the factors affecting depth resolution for low‐dimensional devices. Finally the importance of imaging or scanning SIMS for chemical mapping and microanalysis of final device structures is discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-317
Number of pages9
JournalSurface and Interface Analysis
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Surface analysis
Secondary ion mass spectrometry
secondary ion mass spectrometry
Semiconductor materials
Substrates
Imaging techniques
Microanalysis
microanalysis
Epitaxial growth
examination
Scanning
preparation
scanning
profiles
gallium arsenide

Cite this

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abstract = "The application of static, dynamic and imaging SIMS to semiconductor starting materials and devices is discussed. Static SIMS is used to examine the effect of various chemical preparation methods on the surface of the III‐V compounds InAs, InP and GaAs prior to epitaxial growth of device structures. Dynamic SIMS profiles from a superlattice structure involving alternative GaAlAs ‐ GaAs layers are presented along with an examination of the factors affecting depth resolution for low‐dimensional devices. Finally the importance of imaging or scanning SIMS for chemical mapping and microanalysis of final device structures is discussed.",
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The application of secondary Ion mass spectrometry to surface analysis of semiconductor substrates and devices. / Brown, A.; van den Berg, J. A.; Vickerman, J. C.

In: Surface and Interface Analysis, Vol. 9, No. 5, 07.1986, p. 309-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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