The buffering role of servant leadership on the relationship between organizational politics and employee task performance and citizenship behaviors

Mohammad Nisar Khattak, Peter O'Connor, Noor Muhammad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether servant leadership (SL) buffers the negative relationship between perceived organizational politics (POP) and employee performance outcomes.
Design/methodology/approach: Time-lagged multi source data were collected from 236 supervisor-subordinate dyads in a public sector university in Pakistan. SL, POP and several control variables were measured in subordinates at time 1, and supervisor ratings of organization citizenship behaviors and task performance were measured at time 2. The authors performed moderated multiple regression analysis to test the hypotheses underpinning the study.
Findings: Findings revealed that POP was negatively related to employee task performance and two types of organization citizenship behavior (individual and organizational). Findings also revealed that SL attenuated the negative effect of POP on employee task performance and the two types of organization citizenship behavior.
Practical implications: SL is particularly important in organizational cultures characterized by high politics; therefore, managers seeking to enhance task performance and citizenship behavior in employees should adopt this style of leadership if possible.
Originality/value: This is the first study conducted in the South Asian context that has examined whether, and how, SL buffers the negative effects of POP on employee task performance and organization citizenship behavior.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
JournalPersonnel Review
Early online date14 Feb 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

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