The development and evaluation of a 'blended' enquiry based learning model for mental health nursing students: "making your experience count"

Lindsay Rigby, Ian Wilson, John Baker, Tim Walton, Owen Price, Kate Dunne, Philip Keeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To meet the demands required for safe and effective care, nurses must be able to integrate theoretical knowledge with clinical practice (Kohen and Lehman, 2008; Polit and Beck, 2008; Shirey, 2006). This should include the ability to adapt research in response to changing clinical environments and the changing needs of service users. It is through reflective practice that students develop their clinical reasoning and evaluation skills to engage in this process.This paper aims to describe the development, implementation and evaluation of a project designed to provide a structural approach to the recognition and resolution of clinical, theoretical and ethical dilemmas identified by 3rd year undergraduate mental health nursing students. This is the first paper to describe the iterative process of developing a 'blended' learning model which provides students with an opportunity to experience the process of supervision and to become more proficient in using information technology to develop and maintain their clinical skills.Three cohorts of student nurses were exposed to various combinations of face to face group supervision and a virtual learning environment (VLE) in order to apply their knowledge of good practice guidelines and evidenced-based practice to identified clinical issues. A formal qualitative evaluation using independently facilitated focus groups was conducted with each student cohort and thematically analysed (Miles & Huberman, 1994). The themes that emerged were: relevance to practice; facilitation of independent learning; and the discussion of clinical issues.The results of this study show that 'blending' face-to-face groups with an e-learning component was the most acceptable and effective form of delivery which met the needs of students' varied learning styles. Additionally, students reported that they were more aware of the importance of clinical supervision and of their role as supervisees.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-308
Number of pages6
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2012
Externally publishedYes

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