The experiences of patients and carers in the daily management of care at the end of life

Beth Hardy, Nigel King, Alison Rodriguez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Home is the preferred location for most people with an advanced disease and at the end of life. A variety of care professionals work in community settings to provide support to this population. Patients and their spouses, who also care for them (spouse-carers), are rarely accompanied by these sources of support at all times, and have to manage independently between their contact with care professionals. 

Aim: To explore how patients and spouse-carers manage their involvement with care professionals in the community setting.

Method: Interpretive phenomenology informs the design of the research, whereby 16 interviews were conducted with the patients and spouse-carers. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using phenomenological techniques including template analysis.

Findings: Patients and spouse-carers were interdependent and both parties played a role in co-ordinating care and managing relationships with professional care providers. The patients and spouse-carers actively made choices about how to manage their situation, and develop and modify managing strategies based on their experiences.

Conclusions: When daily management is effective and care professionals acknowledge the dyadic nature of the patient and spouse-carer relationship, people have confidence in living with advanced disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)591-598
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Palliative Nursing
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Dec 2014

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Terminal Care
Spouses
Caregivers
Interviews
Research Design
Population

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The experiences of patients and carers in the daily management of care at the end of life. / Hardy, Beth; King, Nigel; Rodriguez, Alison.

In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Vol. 20, No. 12, 19.12.2014, p. 591-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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