The feasibility and acceptability of an approach to emotional wellbeing support for high school students

Sarah Kendal, Peter Callery, Philip Keeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Emotional wellbeing of young people has high global and national priority. UK high schools are under pressure to address this but lack evidence-based guidelines. Method: Students (N=23) (aged 11-16 years) and staff (N=27) from three urban UK high schools participated in qualitative interviews to explore the feasibility and acceptability of an approach to emotional wellbeing support. Key components were: self-referral, guided self-help, and delivery by school pastoral and support staff. Findings: Confidentiality, emotional support, effectiveness and delivery modes were important to students. Organisational values influenced feasibility. Conclusions: Understanding a school's moral and operational framework can enhance the development of suitable emotional wellbeing support.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-200
Number of pages8
JournalChild and Adolescent Mental Health
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Students
Confidentiality
Referral and Consultation
Guidelines
Interviews
Pressure

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Kendal, Sarah ; Callery, Peter ; Keeley, Philip. / The feasibility and acceptability of an approach to emotional wellbeing support for high school students. In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health. 2011 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 193-200.
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The feasibility and acceptability of an approach to emotional wellbeing support for high school students. / Kendal, Sarah; Callery, Peter; Keeley, Philip.

In: Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Vol. 16, No. 4, 01.11.2011, p. 193-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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