'The Fever of Vain Longing': Emotions of War in Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto III

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This essay deals with Byron's visit to the field of Waterloo as described in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto III. I will suggest that the Canto sees the transformation of the Byronic hero into the man of feeling. Byron re-configures this eighteenth-century character type in a way that his personal grief becomes inseparable from collective feeling and national concerns. The deployment of the man of feeling becomes for Byron a political statement: an aid for the articulation of his disappointment in post-Waterloo European politics and a longing for lost Revolutionary ideals. Through the analysis of the Canto's main organising tropes I will be arguing that Byron's ambivalent perspective on the outcome of Waterloo is the reason for the restless oscillation of conflicting forces in the poem. The essay will re-read Stanza 33's broken mirror simile in the context of eighteenth-century notions of sensibility and sympathy.

LanguageEnglish
Pages86-98
Number of pages13
JournalRomanticism
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online date1 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

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The Cantos
Waterloo
Pilgrimage
Longing
Emotion
Fever
Grief
Political Statements
Tropes
Simile
Poem
Ideal
Sensibility
Organizing
Disappointment
Sympathy
Articulation
Hero
Oscillation
Stanza

Cite this

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'The Fever of Vain Longing' : Emotions of War in Byron's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto III. / Csengei, Ildiko.

In: Romanticism, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.04.2018, p. 86-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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