The impact of classroom design on pupils' learning: Final results of a holistic, multi-level analysis

Peter Barrett, Fay Davies, Yufan Zhang, Lucinda Barrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Assessments have been made of 153 classrooms in 27 schools in order to identify the impact of the physical classroom features on the academic progress of the 3766 pupils who occupied each of those specific spaces. This study confirms the utility of the naturalness, individuality and stimulation (or more memorably, SIN) conceptual model as a vehicle to organise and study the full range of sensory impacts experienced by an individual occupying a given space. In this particular case the naturalness design principle accounts for around 50% of the impact on learning, with the other two accounting for roughly a quarter each. Within this structure, seven key design parameters have been identified that together explain 16% of the variation in pupils' academic progress achieved. These are Light, Temperature, Air Quality, Ownership, Flexibility, Complexity and Colour. The muted impact of the whole-building level of analysis provides some support for the importance of "inside-out design".The identification of the impact of the built environment factors on learning progress is a major new finding for schools' research, but also suggests that the scale of the impact of building design on human performance and wellbeing in general, can be isolated and that it is non-trivial. It is argued that it makes sense to capitalise on this promising progress and to further develop these concepts and techniques.

LanguageEnglish
Pages118-133
Number of pages16
JournalBuilding and Environment
Volume89
Early online date20 Feb 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes

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multi-level analysis
naturalness
pupil
learning
classroom
architectural design
ownership
air quality
Air quality
school research
learning success
individuality
Color
analysis
flexibility
temperature
air
school
Temperature
performance

Cite this

Barrett, Peter ; Davies, Fay ; Zhang, Yufan ; Barrett, Lucinda. / The impact of classroom design on pupils' learning : Final results of a holistic, multi-level analysis. In: Building and Environment. 2015 ; Vol. 89. pp. 118-133.
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The impact of classroom design on pupils' learning : Final results of a holistic, multi-level analysis. / Barrett, Peter; Davies, Fay; Zhang, Yufan; Barrett, Lucinda.

In: Building and Environment, Vol. 89, 07.2015, p. 118-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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