The impact of early maternal employment on infant wellbeing and attachment

Theresa Nicol, Tracey Hardy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

This article presents the findings of a non-exhaustive critical literature review, which investigates the effects of early maternal employment (EME) on infant attachment and wellbeing. EME is defined as maternal employment commencing in the first year of the infant’s life (Brooks-Gunn et al, 2010). As the number of mothers who return to work after having children has increased drastically over the past 30 years (O’Reilly, 2012), there is currently very little evidence and no current UK policy or guidance in relation to EME in order to support women in making the often difficult decision to return to work after giving birth.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-183
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Health Visiting
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Apr 2017

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abstract = "This article presents the findings of a non-exhaustive critical literature review, which investigates the effects of early maternal employment (EME) on infant attachment and wellbeing. EME is defined as maternal employment commencing in the first year of the infant’s life (Brooks-Gunn et al, 2010). As the number of mothers who return to work after having children has increased drastically over the past 30 years (O’Reilly, 2012), there is currently very little evidence and no current UK policy or guidance in relation to EME in order to support women in making the often difficult decision to return to work after giving birth.",
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The impact of early maternal employment on infant wellbeing and attachment. / Nicol, Theresa ; Hardy, Tracey.

In: Journal of Health Visiting, Vol. 5, No. 4, 20.04.2017, p. 178-183 .

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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N2 - This article presents the findings of a non-exhaustive critical literature review, which investigates the effects of early maternal employment (EME) on infant attachment and wellbeing. EME is defined as maternal employment commencing in the first year of the infant’s life (Brooks-Gunn et al, 2010). As the number of mothers who return to work after having children has increased drastically over the past 30 years (O’Reilly, 2012), there is currently very little evidence and no current UK policy or guidance in relation to EME in order to support women in making the often difficult decision to return to work after giving birth.

AB - This article presents the findings of a non-exhaustive critical literature review, which investigates the effects of early maternal employment (EME) on infant attachment and wellbeing. EME is defined as maternal employment commencing in the first year of the infant’s life (Brooks-Gunn et al, 2010). As the number of mothers who return to work after having children has increased drastically over the past 30 years (O’Reilly, 2012), there is currently very little evidence and no current UK policy or guidance in relation to EME in order to support women in making the often difficult decision to return to work after giving birth.

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KW - Early maternal employment

KW - Health visitor

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