The Integrated Psychosocial Model of Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI)

Daniel Boduszek, Katie Dhingra, Agata Debowska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The integrated psychosocial model of criminal social identity attempts to synthesize, distill, and extend our knowledge and understanding of why people develop criminal social identity, with a particular focus on the psychological and social factors involved. We suggest that the development of criminal social identity results from a complex interplay between four important groups of psychosocial factors: (1) an identity crisis that results in weak bonds with society, peer rejection, and is associated with poor parental attachment and supervision; (2) exposure to a criminal/antisocial environment in the form of associations with criminal friends before, during, and/or after incarceration; (3) a need for identification with a criminal group in order to protect one’s self-esteem; and (4) the moderating role of personality traits in the relationship between criminal/antisocial environment and the development of criminal social identity. The model produces testable hypotheses and points to potential opportunities for intervention and prevention. Directions for future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1023-1031
Number of pages9
JournalDeviant Behavior
Volume37
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

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Social Identification
Identity Crisis
Psychology
identity crisis
psychosocial factors
psychological factors
personality traits
Self Concept
self-esteem
social factors
supervision
Personality
Group

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Boduszek, Daniel ; Dhingra, Katie ; Debowska, Agata. / The Integrated Psychosocial Model of Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI). In: Deviant Behavior. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 9. pp. 1023-1031.
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The Integrated Psychosocial Model of Criminal Social Identity (IPM-CSI). / Boduszek, Daniel; Dhingra, Katie; Debowska, Agata.

In: Deviant Behavior, Vol. 37, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. 1023-1031.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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