The moderating role of rational beliefs in the relationship between irrational beliefs and posttraumatic stress symptomology

Philip Hyland, Mark Shevlin, Gary Adamson, Daniel Boduszek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT) assumes that rational beliefs act as cognitive protective factors against the development of psychopathology; however little empirical evidence exists regarding the nature of the possible protective effects that they offer. Aims: The current study investigates whether rational beliefs moderate the impact of irrational beliefs on posttraumatic stress symptomology (PTS). Method: Three hundred and thirteen active law enforcement, military, and related emergency service personnel took part in the current study. Sequential moderated multiple regression analysis was employed to investigate: (i) the direct impact of irrational beliefs on PTS; (ii) the direct impact of rational beliefs on PTS; (iii) the moderating effects of rational beliefs in the relationship between irrational beliefs and PTS. Results: The irrational beliefs predicted by REBT theory emerged as critical predictors of PTS symptomology, in particular Depreciation beliefs. Rational beliefs (Preferences, and Acceptance beliefs) had a direct, negative impact on levels of PTS, and Acceptance beliefs moderated the impact of Catastrophizing beliefs on PTS. Conclusions: Irrational beliefs are important cognitive vulnerability factors in symptoms of PTS, while rational beliefs (Acceptance) appear to have a protective role in the emergence of PTS symptoms, both directly and by moderating the impact of Catastrophizing beliefs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)312-326
Number of pages15
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Catastrophization
Behavior Therapy
Depreciation
Law Enforcement
Psychopathology
Emergencies
Regression Analysis
Protective Factors

Cite this

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The moderating role of rational beliefs in the relationship between irrational beliefs and posttraumatic stress symptomology. / Hyland, Philip; Shevlin, Mark; Adamson, Gary; Boduszek, Daniel.

In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, Vol. 42, No. 3, 2014, p. 312-326.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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