The natural history of child abuse: A study in social problem definition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a natural history model, this paper attempts to understand and explain why the problem of child abuse was recognized in Britain when it was and in the manner in which it was. It traces its development from the initial discovery in America. Particular emphasis is given to the work of the NSPCC battered child research unit, Sir Keith Joseph, the Tunbridge Wells Study Group and the media in contributing to the social reaction to the case of Maria Colwell, which established non-accidental injury as a major social problem in Britain. These developments have had implications for the changing role of the personal social services and may reflect broader changes in the control culture and the relationship between the state and the family.

LanguageEnglish
Pages431-451
Number of pages21
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1979

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social problem
abuse of children
Child Abuse
Social Problems
Natural History
Social Work
personal services
Wounds and Injuries
study group
history
Research
mobile social services

Cite this

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The natural history of child abuse : A study in social problem definition. / Parton, Nigel.

In: British Journal of Social Work, Vol. 9, No. 4, 01.01.1979, p. 431-451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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