The public relations process: A re-think

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Much new work has been undertaken in the field of strategic management in recent years. Corporate planning, especially popular in the 1980s, has given way to new and dynamic management models. Similarly, various techniques for making organisations more effective such as ‘management by objectives’ (MBO) and ‘total quality management’ (TQM) have been employed. Business process re-engineering (BPR) as proposed by Hammer and Champny was regarded as a radical leap forward in business organisation, but that is being challenged by the newer business transformation as propounded by Gouillart and Kelly and by the concept of the supply chain. Whatever management techniques are used, slimmer, flatter organisations are emerging as ‘right-size’ and re-organised organisations. The role of public relations in strategic management and organisation is crucial. Management theorists agree that good communication is vital to successful organisations. Despite the problems associated with it, BPR and its successors are expected to be major infuences on the way in which enterprises are organised. What is now required is a re-thinking of the structure and role of public relations within process-oriented organisations. This paper offers some initial thinking on how this could be done and the inherent difficulties. Some of the ideas are borrowed from BPR, but no judgement is made as to whether BPR is a ‘right’ approach. The paper then goes on to look at the implications for the way in which public relations can effectively contribute to ‘new’ organisations and the critical role of information technology.

LanguageEnglish
Pages115-124
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Communication Management
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Public relations
engineering
strategic management
Industry
management approach
management
quality assurance
Total quality management
information technology
Business process re-engineering
Hammers
supply
planning
Supply chains
communication
Information technology
Planning
Strategic management
Communication

Cite this

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The public relations process : A re-think. / Gregory, Anne.

In: Journal of Communication Management, Vol. 2, No. 2, 1997, p. 115-124.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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