The reliability of the Leeds Movement Performance Index (LMPI)

A new tool for neurological physiotherapy

Denise H. Ross, Serena McCluskey, Phyl Fletcher-Cook, John Stephenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Measuring movement performance in people with neurological damage requires a tool that reflects physiotherapy assessment and clinical reasoning. The Leeds Movement Performance Index (LMPI) was previously developed by a group of neurological physiotherapists to fulfill these requirements. Objective: To assess the reliability of the LMPI for use in neurological physiotherapy practice. Methods: Twelve senior neurological physiotherapists were trained to use the LMPI and then asked to measure the movement performance of five patients whose movement had been previously video-recorded for this purpose. A retest session was completed after two weeks. Data were analysed to establish internal and external reliability. Results: Internal reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, applied to the entire scale (0.862) and to each item (range 0.795-0.892). External (inter-rater) reliability was assessed by a calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient for scores awarded by multiple raters (0.959), with individual item reliability ranging from 0.874 to 0.968. External (test-retest) reliability was assessed by calculating the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between scores obtained on two testing occasions (0.792) with values of individual items ranging from 0.397 to 0.674. A variance components analysis partitioned variance into components arising from between-patient variability (55.2%) between-therapist variability (7.8%) and between-testing variability (2.8%). Conclusions: Results indicate that the LMPI is a reliable measurement tool when used by senior neurological physiotherapists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)581-587
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiotherapy Theory and Practice
Volume30
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014

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Physical Therapy Modalities
Physical Therapists
Reproducibility of Results
Analysis of Variance
Nonparametric Statistics

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Measuring movement performance in people with neurological damage requires a tool that reflects physiotherapy assessment and clinical reasoning. The Leeds Movement Performance Index (LMPI) was previously developed by a group of neurological physiotherapists to fulfill these requirements. Objective: To assess the reliability of the LMPI for use in neurological physiotherapy practice. Methods: Twelve senior neurological physiotherapists were trained to use the LMPI and then asked to measure the movement performance of five patients whose movement had been previously video-recorded for this purpose. A retest session was completed after two weeks. Data were analysed to establish internal and external reliability. Results: Internal reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha coefficient, applied to the entire scale (0.862) and to each item (range 0.795-0.892). External (inter-rater) reliability was assessed by a calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient for scores awarded by multiple raters (0.959), with individual item reliability ranging from 0.874 to 0.968. External (test-retest) reliability was assessed by calculating the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between scores obtained on two testing occasions (0.792) with values of individual items ranging from 0.397 to 0.674. A variance components analysis partitioned variance into components arising from between-patient variability (55.2{\%}) between-therapist variability (7.8{\%}) and between-testing variability (2.8{\%}). Conclusions: Results indicate that the LMPI is a reliable measurement tool when used by senior neurological physiotherapists.",
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The reliability of the Leeds Movement Performance Index (LMPI) : A new tool for neurological physiotherapy. / Ross, Denise H.; McCluskey, Serena; Fletcher-Cook, Phyl; Stephenson, John.

In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, Vol. 30, No. 8, 01.11.2014, p. 581-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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