The role of style in reader-involvement

Deictic shifting in contemporary poems

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article investigates the language of two contrasting contemporary poems in English: "Mittens" by Peter Sansom and "Pain tells you what to wear" by Mebdh McGuckian. The different experiences of reading them are explored using concepts drawn from the narrative theories of Emmott (1997), deictic shift theory (see McIntyre 2006), and blending theory (see Dancygier 2005), with the aim of explaining some of the apparent differences of reader-involvement. Questions of identity and reference are raised in relation to the use of pronouns in such poems, the potential effects of blending of deictic centres is explored and the different literary effects of bringing the reader into the deictic centre or voiding the deictic centre are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-85
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Literary Semantics
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

pain
narrative
language
Poem
Deictic
Deictic Center
Reader
experience
Pronoun
Pain
Language
Theory of Narrative

Cite this

@article{b4c95e6927584d9fba65f25d66a21092,
title = "The role of style in reader-involvement: Deictic shifting in contemporary poems",
abstract = "This article investigates the language of two contrasting contemporary poems in English: {"}Mittens{"} by Peter Sansom and {"}Pain tells you what to wear{"} by Mebdh McGuckian. The different experiences of reading them are explored using concepts drawn from the narrative theories of Emmott (1997), deictic shift theory (see McIntyre 2006), and blending theory (see Dancygier 2005), with the aim of explaining some of the apparent differences of reader-involvement. Questions of identity and reference are raised in relation to the use of pronouns in such poems, the potential effects of blending of deictic centres is explored and the different literary effects of bringing the reader into the deictic centre or voiding the deictic centre are discussed.",
author = "Lesley Jeffries",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1515/jlse.2008.005",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "69--85",
journal = "Journal of Literary Semantics",
issn = "0341-7638",
publisher = "De Gruyter Mouton",
number = "1",

}

The role of style in reader-involvement : Deictic shifting in contemporary poems. / Jeffries, Lesley.

In: Journal of Literary Semantics, Vol. 37, No. 1, 04.2008, p. 69-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of style in reader-involvement

T2 - Deictic shifting in contemporary poems

AU - Jeffries, Lesley

PY - 2008/4

Y1 - 2008/4

N2 - This article investigates the language of two contrasting contemporary poems in English: "Mittens" by Peter Sansom and "Pain tells you what to wear" by Mebdh McGuckian. The different experiences of reading them are explored using concepts drawn from the narrative theories of Emmott (1997), deictic shift theory (see McIntyre 2006), and blending theory (see Dancygier 2005), with the aim of explaining some of the apparent differences of reader-involvement. Questions of identity and reference are raised in relation to the use of pronouns in such poems, the potential effects of blending of deictic centres is explored and the different literary effects of bringing the reader into the deictic centre or voiding the deictic centre are discussed.

AB - This article investigates the language of two contrasting contemporary poems in English: "Mittens" by Peter Sansom and "Pain tells you what to wear" by Mebdh McGuckian. The different experiences of reading them are explored using concepts drawn from the narrative theories of Emmott (1997), deictic shift theory (see McIntyre 2006), and blending theory (see Dancygier 2005), with the aim of explaining some of the apparent differences of reader-involvement. Questions of identity and reference are raised in relation to the use of pronouns in such poems, the potential effects of blending of deictic centres is explored and the different literary effects of bringing the reader into the deictic centre or voiding the deictic centre are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=57749142194&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1515/jlse.2008.005

DO - 10.1515/jlse.2008.005

M3 - Review article

VL - 37

SP - 69

EP - 85

JO - Journal of Literary Semantics

JF - Journal of Literary Semantics

SN - 0341-7638

IS - 1

ER -