The syntax of orientation shifting: Evidence from English high adverbs

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This paper reviews new data supporting the inclusion of a Speech Act Phrase in the left periphery. Illocutionary and evidential adverbs in English shift orientation from speakers in declarative sentences to addressees in yes-no interrogative sentences. This orientation shift falls out of independently motivated principles: the adverbs contain a logophorically-sensitive PRO subject which is controlled by a syntactic representation of the discourse participants contained in a Speech Act Phrase high in the CP layer. It will be suggested that clause type modulates which discourse participants are available; only speakers are available in declaratives whereas addressees are also available in interrogatives.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationConSOLE XXII
Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe
EditorsMartin Kohlberger, Kate Bellamy, Eleanor Dutton
PublisherLeiden University
Pages205-230
Number of pages26
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014
Externally publishedYes
Event22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe - Leiden University Centre for Linguistics, Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: 8 Jan 201410 Jan 2014
Conference number: XXII
https://sites.google.com/site/consolexxii/ (Link to Conference Website)

Conference

Conference22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe
Abbreviated titleConSOLE 2014
CountryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period8/01/1410/01/14
Internet address

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syntax
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Cite this

Woods, R. (2014). The syntax of orientation shifting: Evidence from English high adverbs. In M. Kohlberger, K. Bellamy, & E. Dutton (Eds.), ConSOLE XXII: Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe (pp. 205-230). Leiden University.
Woods, Rebecca. / The syntax of orientation shifting : Evidence from English high adverbs. ConSOLE XXII: Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe. editor / Martin Kohlberger ; Kate Bellamy ; Eleanor Dutton. Leiden University, 2014. pp. 205-230
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title = "The syntax of orientation shifting: Evidence from English high adverbs",
abstract = "This paper reviews new data supporting the inclusion of a Speech Act Phrase in the left periphery. Illocutionary and evidential adverbs in English shift orientation from speakers in declarative sentences to addressees in yes-no interrogative sentences. This orientation shift falls out of independently motivated principles: the adverbs contain a logophorically-sensitive PRO subject which is controlled by a syntactic representation of the discourse participants contained in a Speech Act Phrase high in the CP layer. It will be suggested that clause type modulates which discourse participants are available; only speakers are available in declaratives whereas addressees are also available in interrogatives.",
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Woods, R 2014, The syntax of orientation shifting: Evidence from English high adverbs. in M Kohlberger, K Bellamy & E Dutton (eds), ConSOLE XXII: Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe. Leiden University, pp. 205-230, 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe, Lisbon, Portugal, 8/01/14.

The syntax of orientation shifting : Evidence from English high adverbs. / Woods, Rebecca.

ConSOLE XXII: Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe. ed. / Martin Kohlberger; Kate Bellamy; Eleanor Dutton. Leiden University, 2014. p. 205-230.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Woods R. The syntax of orientation shifting: Evidence from English high adverbs. In Kohlberger M, Bellamy K, Dutton E, editors, ConSOLE XXII: Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Student Organization of Linguistics in Europe. Leiden University. 2014. p. 205-230