‘‘the uttermost perfection of all wind instruments’: Franz Tausch (1762–1817) as virtuoso clarinetist and director of the Conservatorium der Bläseinstrumente in Berlin

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Abstract

Franz Tausch (1762–1817) received his musical education at the Mannheim and Munich courts of Carl Theodor II, where he was exposed to a wide range of cultural and musical influences. He emerged in the 1780s as a virtuoso musician, and in the face of growing instability at the Munich court, moved to Berlin in 1789. There he established himself as a solo virtuoso, gained a position in the Hofkapelle, and engaged with the public concert life and private salon culture of the city, before establishing a Conservatorium der Blasinstrumente, a Gesellschaft for professional and dilletante wind players.

A study of Tausch’s compositions is in parallel with a biographical account is used to explore the musical culture that Tausch moved within and the different roles he served with it. Tausch’s concertos and quartets for clarinet and strings are evidence of virtuoso performance practices and the development of the clarinet in the late C18th; his 13 Pièces en Quatuor Op. 22 reflect Tausch’s involvement with salon culture in Berlin C. 1800; and his Serenade for clarinets, horns and bassoons and arrangement of Himmel’s Fanchon das Leyermädchen for winds illustrates the transition from wind music as a courtly diversion to a vehicle for artistic expression in a concert setting.
LanguageEnglish
JournalMusic and Letters
Volume100
Issue number4
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 22 Nov 2018

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Virtuoso
Perfection
Clarinet
Conservatorium
Wind Instruments
Salon
Concert
Munich
Players
Solo
Strings
Serenade
Concerto
1780s
Quartet
Cultural Influences
Artistic Expression
Mannheim
Musicians
Education

Cite this

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title = "‘‘the uttermost perfection of all wind instruments’: Franz Tausch (1762–1817) as virtuoso clarinetist and director of the Conservatorium der Bl{\"a}seinstrumente in Berlin",
abstract = "Franz Tausch (1762–1817) received his musical education at the Mannheim and Munich courts of Carl Theodor II, where he was exposed to a wide range of cultural and musical influences. He emerged in the 1780s as a virtuoso musician, and in the face of growing instability at the Munich court, moved to Berlin in 1789. There he established himself as a solo virtuoso, gained a position in the Hofkapelle, and engaged with the public concert life and private salon culture of the city, before establishing a Conservatorium der Blasinstrumente, a Gesellschaft for professional and dilletante wind players. A study of Tausch’s compositions is in parallel with a biographical account is used to explore the musical culture that Tausch moved within and the different roles he served with it. Tausch’s concertos and quartets for clarinet and strings are evidence of virtuoso performance practices and the development of the clarinet in the late C18th; his 13 Pi{\`e}ces en Quatuor Op. 22 reflect Tausch’s involvement with salon culture in Berlin C. 1800; and his Serenade for clarinets, horns and bassoons and arrangement of Himmel’s Fanchon das Leyerm{\"a}dchen for winds illustrates the transition from wind music as a courtly diversion to a vehicle for artistic expression in a concert setting.",
author = "Emily Worthington",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "22",
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journal = "Music and Letters",
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