The work that visualisation conventions do

Helen Kennedy, Rosemary Lucy Hill, Giorgia Aiello, William Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper argues that visualisation conventions work to make the data represented within visualisations seem objective, that is, transparent and factual. Interrogating the work that visualisation conventions do helps us to make sense of the apparent contradiction between criticisms of visualisations as doing persuasive work and visualisation designers’ belief that through visualisation, it is possible to ‘do good with data’ (Periscopic, 2014). We focus on four conventions which imbue visualisations with a sense of objectivity, transparency and facticity. These include: a) two-dimensional viewpoints; b) clean layouts; c) geometric shapes and lines; d) the inclusion of data sources. We argue that thinking about visualisations from a social semiotic standpoint, as we do in this paper by bringing together what visualisation designers say about their intentions with a semiotic analysis of the visualisations they produce, advances understanding of the ways that data visualisations come into being, how they are imbued with particular qualities and how power operates in and through them. Thus this paper contributes nuanced understanding of data visualisations and their production, by uncovering the ways in which power is at work within them. In turn, it advances debate about data in society and the emerging field of data studies.
LanguageEnglish
Pages715-735
Number of pages21
JournalInformation Communication and Society
Volume19
Issue number6
Early online date16 Mar 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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visualization
Visualization
Semiotics
Data visualization
semiotics
Transparency
objectivity
layout
transparency
criticism
inclusion

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Kennedy, Helen ; Hill, Rosemary Lucy ; Aiello, Giorgia ; Allen, William. / The work that visualisation conventions do. In: Information Communication and Society. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 715-735.
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The work that visualisation conventions do. / Kennedy, Helen; Hill, Rosemary Lucy; Aiello, Giorgia; Allen, William.

In: Information Communication and Society, Vol. 19, No. 6, 2016, p. 715-735.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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