'They are just good people...generally good people'

perspectives of young men on relationships with social care workers in the UK

Brid Featherstone, Martin Robb, Sandy Ruxton, Michael R M Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The perspectives of marginalised young men on what they value in relationships with social care workers are under-researched and have not received adequate attention within policy and practice literatures. Moreover, problematic assumptions about gender pervade much political and cultural commentary. Research findings from a study of 50 young men, aged between 16 and 25, attending a range of social care services, are highly significant in this context. They highlight young men's investment in a language of care and respect and their rejection of categorical presumptions. However, the services were steeped in practices and understandings of their marginalisation and offered important opportunities for recognition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-341
Number of pages11
JournalChildren and Society
Volume31
Issue number5
Early online date22 Dec 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

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worker
Social Work
respect
Language
gender
language
Research
Values
literature
Rejection (Psychology)

Cite this

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'They are just good people...generally good people' : perspectives of young men on relationships with social care workers in the UK. / Featherstone, Brid; Robb, Martin; Ruxton, Sandy; Ward, Michael R M.

In: Children and Society, Vol. 31, No. 5, 09.2017, p. 331-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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