To Sing the Body Electric: Instruments and Effort in the Performance of Electronic Music

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Visualized emotion can be transmitted through minimal physical gestures in a musical performance; this process can be described as 'sentic', a term originally coined by Manfred Clynes in the 1970s during research into the effects of space travel. The development of alternate musical instruments from the 1960s up to the present day breaks the traditional musical paradigm of effort in performance. This development also shadows concepts of space exploration technology such as teleoperation. Musical instruments can be evaluated in terms of a new musical effort paradigm; a young generation seems content to accept that there may be no apparent correlation between input effort and sound output. This article explores what a contemporary notion of effort might be, inspired by a reading of Walt Whitman's poem 'I Sing the Body Electric'.

LanguageEnglish
Pages183-191
Number of pages9
JournalContemporary Music Review
Volume25
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Musical instruments
Remote control
Acoustic waves
Electronic music
Paradigm
Musical Instruments
Walt Whitman
Emotion
Physical
1960s
Gesture
Musical Performance
1970s
Young Generation
Sound
Poem

Cite this

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To Sing the Body Electric : Instruments and Effort in the Performance of Electronic Music. / d'Escrivan, Julio.

In: Contemporary Music Review, Vol. 25, No. 1-2, 2006, p. 183-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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