Trusting technology: Security decision making at airports

Alan Avi Kirschenbaum, Michele Mariani, Coen Van Gulijk, Carmit Rapaport, Sharon Lubasz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using data from a field survey of airport employees across European airports, we identify how trust in security technology affects the implementation of security rules and regulations. An analysis of respondents from eight airports in Europe demonstrated that compliance with security rules and protocols was related to two main categories of trust in technology: one oriented to the technology itself and the other to technology as a means of catching offenders. A further multivariate analysis showed that security decisions by each 'trusting' group tended to reflect its degree of commitment to the organizations' administrative guidelines and the organizations' security attitude.

LanguageEnglish
Pages57-60
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Air Transport Management
Volume25
Early online date20 Sep 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012
Externally publishedYes

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airport
Airports
Decision making
decision making
administrative organization
multivariate analysis
field survey
Personnel
compliance
offender
employee
commitment
regulation
Group

Cite this

Kirschenbaum, A. A., Mariani, M., Van Gulijk, C., Rapaport, C., & Lubasz, S. (2012). Trusting technology: Security decision making at airports. Journal of Air Transport Management, 25, 57-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jairtraman.2012.08.005
Kirschenbaum, Alan Avi ; Mariani, Michele ; Van Gulijk, Coen ; Rapaport, Carmit ; Lubasz, Sharon. / Trusting technology : Security decision making at airports. In: Journal of Air Transport Management. 2012 ; Vol. 25. pp. 57-60.
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Kirschenbaum, AA, Mariani, M, Van Gulijk, C, Rapaport, C & Lubasz, S 2012, 'Trusting technology: Security decision making at airports', Journal of Air Transport Management, vol. 25, pp. 57-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jairtraman.2012.08.005

Trusting technology : Security decision making at airports. / Kirschenbaum, Alan Avi; Mariani, Michele; Van Gulijk, Coen; Rapaport, Carmit; Lubasz, Sharon.

In: Journal of Air Transport Management, Vol. 25, 12.2012, p. 57-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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